Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Placing Empire: Travel and the Social Imagination in Imperial Japan by Kate McDonald (review)

Placing Empire: Travel and the Social Imagination in Imperial Japan by Kate McDonald (review) 176 China Review International: Vol. 23, No. 2, 2016 culture, and Republican history. Those acquainted with Lu Xun, Xu Beihong, Cai Yuanpei, and Ai Jing would appreciate Lufkin’s nuanced discussions of these cultural luminaries. While Lufkin provides clear and concise summaries of significant historical events, those unfamiliar with the historical prestige of Chinese literati ink arts might lack the context for understanding what was at stake for educated artists embracing folk art in the early twentieth century. Lufkin’s monograph is a valuable contribution to the field of modern Chinese art history through its specific focus on folk art, a broad category that has yet to receive adequate attention from art historians of Chinese art outside of China. This book joins a small but cohesive body of scholarship that examines folk art as indices of socialist modernity, including James Flath’s book on New Year pictures and Ka-Ming Wu’s work on Chinese papercuts. Along with other recent efforts in the field, these texts create an exciting space for future work that will continue to expand the scope of twentieth-century Chinese art. Yang Wang Yang Wang is an assistant professor of art history at the University of Colorado Denver specializing in art http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Placing Empire: Travel and the Social Imagination in Imperial Japan by Kate McDonald (review)

China Review International , Volume 23 (2) – May 11, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/i-placing-empire-travel-and-the-social-imagination-in-imperial-japan-i-wd4hHZDPRg
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

176 China Review International: Vol. 23, No. 2, 2016 culture, and Republican history. Those acquainted with Lu Xun, Xu Beihong, Cai Yuanpei, and Ai Jing would appreciate Lufkin’s nuanced discussions of these cultural luminaries. While Lufkin provides clear and concise summaries of significant historical events, those unfamiliar with the historical prestige of Chinese literati ink arts might lack the context for understanding what was at stake for educated artists embracing folk art in the early twentieth century. Lufkin’s monograph is a valuable contribution to the field of modern Chinese art history through its specific focus on folk art, a broad category that has yet to receive adequate attention from art historians of Chinese art outside of China. This book joins a small but cohesive body of scholarship that examines folk art as indices of socialist modernity, including James Flath’s book on New Year pictures and Ka-Ming Wu’s work on Chinese papercuts. Along with other recent efforts in the field, these texts create an exciting space for future work that will continue to expand the scope of twentieth-century Chinese art. Yang Wang Yang Wang is an assistant professor of art history at the University of Colorado Denver specializing in art

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 11, 2018

There are no references for this article.