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Mr. Isherwood Changes Trains: Christopher Isherwood and the Search for the "Home Self." (review)

Mr. Isherwood Changes Trains: Christopher Isherwood and the Search for the "Home Self." (review) Reviews 341 yard; his voice changes from casual and reportorial to complex and refl ective. The daybook shows him that he was wrong in how he had taught the person- al essay. He had thought that style was “the overriding determinant of voice” (145). Now, his writing process teaches him that “the self inhabiting a piece of prose is the product of so many things in addition to style—the length of the piece, as well as its form, its mode, its mood, its gist, its pacing, its point of view, its state of mind” (145). That gestalt of infl uence means the voice, or persona, has no choice but to be a chameleon—always changing. The “I” is mutable—like life. Elizabeth S. (Beth) Taylor Vincent Marsh. Mr. Isherwood Changes Trains: Christopher Isherwood and the Search for the “Home Self.” Melbourne: Clouds of Magellan, 2010. 299 pp. ISBN 978-0980712056, $15.00. Christopher Isherwood’s conversion to Vedanta, and his decades-long devo- tion to the cult of Ramakrishna, puzzled his contemporaries; most critics, with a few notable exceptions like Antony Copley’s A Spiritual Bloomsbury, have ignored it. His reputation as the grandfather of gay liberation has over- shadowed his religious devotion, despite his translations, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Mr. Isherwood Changes Trains: Christopher Isherwood and the Search for the "Home Self." (review)

Biography , Volume 34 (2) – Nov 23, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Biographical Research Center
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

Reviews 341 yard; his voice changes from casual and reportorial to complex and refl ective. The daybook shows him that he was wrong in how he had taught the person- al essay. He had thought that style was “the overriding determinant of voice” (145). Now, his writing process teaches him that “the self inhabiting a piece of prose is the product of so many things in addition to style—the length of the piece, as well as its form, its mode, its mood, its gist, its pacing, its point of view, its state of mind” (145). That gestalt of infl uence means the voice, or persona, has no choice but to be a chameleon—always changing. The “I” is mutable—like life. Elizabeth S. (Beth) Taylor Vincent Marsh. Mr. Isherwood Changes Trains: Christopher Isherwood and the Search for the “Home Self.” Melbourne: Clouds of Magellan, 2010. 299 pp. ISBN 978-0980712056, $15.00. Christopher Isherwood’s conversion to Vedanta, and his decades-long devo- tion to the cult of Ramakrishna, puzzled his contemporaries; most critics, with a few notable exceptions like Antony Copley’s A Spiritual Bloomsbury, have ignored it. His reputation as the grandfather of gay liberation has over- shadowed his religious devotion, despite his translations,

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 23, 2011

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