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Literary Biography: An Introduction (review)

Literary Biography: An Introduction (review) 552 Biography 33.3 (Summer 2010) “I cannot explain this sentence. When I write things like that, I am trying to touch my reader affectively, in other words irrationally, almost sensually. For me, words have a charge. I fi nd myself incapable of escaping the bite of a word, the vertigo of a question mark” (qtd. in Macey 159). This written charge remains an indispensable challenge to postcolonial studies, and so the autobiographical Fanon is a constant presence in this book. In particular, Moore-Gilbert returns to Black Skin, White Masks in every chapter, each time noting the ways Fanon preempts the discussion either thematically or formal- ly; this text, it is argued, “provides a template for later postcolonial writers” (71). This emphasis is certainly striking, given the common complaint that Homi Bhabha has shifted attention too far towards this earlier Fanon text at the expense of the later revolutionary writings. But Moore-Gilbert’s references to Fanon make a compelling case for the importance of this particular text, which seems to become only more useful as the years go by. Perhaps the most striking reference made to Fanon is the argument that his work is future-oriented; accordingly, Fanon’s work eludes any accusation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Literary Biography: An Introduction (review)

Biography , Volume 33 (3) – Oct 30, 2010

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Biographical Research Center
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

552 Biography 33.3 (Summer 2010) “I cannot explain this sentence. When I write things like that, I am trying to touch my reader affectively, in other words irrationally, almost sensually. For me, words have a charge. I fi nd myself incapable of escaping the bite of a word, the vertigo of a question mark” (qtd. in Macey 159). This written charge remains an indispensable challenge to postcolonial studies, and so the autobiographical Fanon is a constant presence in this book. In particular, Moore-Gilbert returns to Black Skin, White Masks in every chapter, each time noting the ways Fanon preempts the discussion either thematically or formal- ly; this text, it is argued, “provides a template for later postcolonial writers” (71). This emphasis is certainly striking, given the common complaint that Homi Bhabha has shifted attention too far towards this earlier Fanon text at the expense of the later revolutionary writings. But Moore-Gilbert’s references to Fanon make a compelling case for the importance of this particular text, which seems to become only more useful as the years go by. Perhaps the most striking reference made to Fanon is the argument that his work is future-oriented; accordingly, Fanon’s work eludes any accusation

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 30, 2010

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