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I La Galigo (review)

I La Galigo (review) r ev i ews Performance Reviews I L A GA LIGO. Directed by Robert Wilson. Text adaptation and dramaturgy by Rhoda Grauer. Music by Rahayu Supanggah. Het Muziektheater, Amsterdam, 12 and 14 May 2004. A scrim is lit with blue light and the projected image of a frayed manuscript written in the Buginese characters of South Sulawesi (Celebes, Indonesia), nine lines on both verso and recto. Silently a bissu priest dressed in traditional regalia enters, clutching a tubular container in a hand that swings in a controlled ark as he walks. He looks around, and sits down in an extension of the proscenium stage overhanging the orchestra pit--a liminal space set off from the playing area. As the bissu takes out a manuscript from the container and sets it upon a wooden stand, preparing to read it, the musicians enter the stage in unison. All are dressed identically in cotton tops and simple plaid sarongs, with cloth headwraps. They approach their dimly lit instruments, a huge variety of Indonesian percussion, wind, and string instruments, arrayed upstage left. The conductor and composer, Rahayu Supanggah, dressed in similar attire, follows. The musicians turn in unison, and sit down behind their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

I La Galigo (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 22 (1) – Feb 15, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

r ev i ews Performance Reviews I L A GA LIGO. Directed by Robert Wilson. Text adaptation and dramaturgy by Rhoda Grauer. Music by Rahayu Supanggah. Het Muziektheater, Amsterdam, 12 and 14 May 2004. A scrim is lit with blue light and the projected image of a frayed manuscript written in the Buginese characters of South Sulawesi (Celebes, Indonesia), nine lines on both verso and recto. Silently a bissu priest dressed in traditional regalia enters, clutching a tubular container in a hand that swings in a controlled ark as he walks. He looks around, and sits down in an extension of the proscenium stage overhanging the orchestra pit--a liminal space set off from the playing area. As the bissu takes out a manuscript from the container and sets it upon a wooden stand, preparing to read it, the musicians enter the stage in unison. All are dressed identically in cotton tops and simple plaid sarongs, with cloth headwraps. They approach their dimly lit instruments, a huge variety of Indonesian percussion, wind, and string instruments, arrayed upstage left. The conductor and composer, Rahayu Supanggah, dressed in similar attire, follows. The musicians turn in unison, and sit down behind their

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 15, 2005

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