<i>Ink and Tears: Memory, Mourning, and Writing in the Yu Family</i> by Rania Huntington (review)

Ink and Tears: Memory, Mourning, and Writing in the Yu Family by Rania Huntington (review) 118 China Review International: Vol. 24, No. 2, 2017 elsewhere in the monumental corpus ascribed to that historian” (p. 73). Nylan’s second important contribution is to examine painstakingly some often neglected portions of the Letter, leading her to another unexpected insight, that it can be read as “a sophisticated rumination on the benefits of male friendship at court” (p. 95). Wai-yee Li adopts yet another approach to Sima Qian’s letter in the book’s final chapter. She begins by positing that “some core of the content of the letter originated with Sima Qian,” but thereafter does not concern herself with the circumstances of the letter’s authorship, turning instead to the question of how the Letter “embodies a defining moment in the conception of authorship” (p. 96). She makes a subtle and sensitive comparison between the letter and Sima Qian’s “Personal Narration” in the final chapter of Shiji in terms of how they present the notion that authors who suffer in life are thereby inspired to write literary works of lasting importance. In an impressively wide-ranging survey, Li studies the tradition in China of linking literary achievement to human misfortune, helpfully illuminating both the Han dynasty context and the Letter’s reverberations http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

<i>Ink and Tears: Memory, Mourning, and Writing in the Yu Family</i> by Rania Huntington (review)

China Review International, Volume 24 (2) – Jun 4, 2019

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

118 China Review International: Vol. 24, No. 2, 2017 elsewhere in the monumental corpus ascribed to that historian” (p. 73). Nylan’s second important contribution is to examine painstakingly some often neglected portions of the Letter, leading her to another unexpected insight, that it can be read as “a sophisticated rumination on the benefits of male friendship at court” (p. 95). Wai-yee Li adopts yet another approach to Sima Qian’s letter in the book’s final chapter. She begins by positing that “some core of the content of the letter originated with Sima Qian,” but thereafter does not concern herself with the circumstances of the letter’s authorship, turning instead to the question of how the Letter “embodies a defining moment in the conception of authorship” (p. 96). She makes a subtle and sensitive comparison between the letter and Sima Qian’s “Personal Narration” in the final chapter of Shiji in terms of how they present the notion that authors who suffer in life are thereby inspired to write literary works of lasting importance. In an impressively wide-ranging survey, Li studies the tradition in China of linking literary achievement to human misfortune, helpfully illuminating both the Han dynasty context and the Letter’s reverberations

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 4, 2019

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