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Eminent Nuns: Women Chan Masters of Seventeenth-Century China by Beata Grant (review)

Eminent Nuns: Women Chan Masters of Seventeenth-Century China by Beata Grant (review) 600 China Review International: Vol. 19, No. 4, 2012 Beata Grant. Eminent Nuns: Women Chan Masters of Seventeenth-Century China. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2009. xi, 242 pp. Epilogue, notes, selected bibliography, index. Hardcover $46.00, isbn 978-0-8248-3202-5. This eminently readable and thoroughly researched work of Beata Grant, a well- known and acclaimed scholar of literature, Buddhism, and women’s studies in China, presents one of the most valuable, unique insights into the role of female Chan (Zen) masters in seventeenth-century China. One of the most compelling aspects of the work is the faultless series of translations of texts left behind by female Chan masters themselves, or their female disciples, who recorded their literary works. Grant allows the women Linji (Japanese: Rinzai) Chan masters to speak for themselves, in faultless prose, or Chan-style verse, which, indeed, makes Eminent Nuns a treasury of citations to be cherished for their own intrinsic worth. e fir Th st and foremost eminent nun, Qiyuan Xinggang (1597–1654), the subject of chapters 3 and 4, laid the groundwork for the disciples and dharma heirs who succeeded her or were inspired to follow in her footsteps. Qiyuan Xinggang’s reasons for becoming a nun — the death of her espoused fiancé, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Eminent Nuns: Women Chan Masters of Seventeenth-Century China by Beata Grant (review)

China Review International , Volume 19 (4) – May 29, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

600 China Review International: Vol. 19, No. 4, 2012 Beata Grant. Eminent Nuns: Women Chan Masters of Seventeenth-Century China. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2009. xi, 242 pp. Epilogue, notes, selected bibliography, index. Hardcover $46.00, isbn 978-0-8248-3202-5. This eminently readable and thoroughly researched work of Beata Grant, a well- known and acclaimed scholar of literature, Buddhism, and women’s studies in China, presents one of the most valuable, unique insights into the role of female Chan (Zen) masters in seventeenth-century China. One of the most compelling aspects of the work is the faultless series of translations of texts left behind by female Chan masters themselves, or their female disciples, who recorded their literary works. Grant allows the women Linji (Japanese: Rinzai) Chan masters to speak for themselves, in faultless prose, or Chan-style verse, which, indeed, makes Eminent Nuns a treasury of citations to be cherished for their own intrinsic worth. e fir Th st and foremost eminent nun, Qiyuan Xinggang (1597–1654), the subject of chapters 3 and 4, laid the groundwork for the disciples and dharma heirs who succeeded her or were inspired to follow in her footsteps. Qiyuan Xinggang’s reasons for becoming a nun — the death of her espoused fiancé,

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 29, 2015

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