<i>Changing Chinese Cities: The Potentials of Field Urbanism</i> by Renee Y. Chow (review)

Changing Chinese Cities: The Potentials of Field Urbanism by Renee Y. Chow (review) Reviews 113 embodiment of an internal and racialized Yellow Peril discourse. This suggests—still following Carrico but also as a conclusion derived from the global scenario sketched by the book as a whole—that we need to think beyond the East-West binary, and that many other binaries exist, including internal and apparently perplexing ones. Generally speaking, Yellow Perils is a remarkable, coherent, and recommendable work that offers an updated and at some moments innovative panoramic discourses about China from a contemporary perspective. Only regrettable is the absence of at least a chapter dealing with the reactions that the economic presence of China is arousing in Latin American countries, a region where Chinese investment has been as important as in Africa. Also, it might have been interesting to see how the book would have worked without the insistence, in almost each and every chapter, on the idea of an essential difference between traditional Yellow Peril discourses and their contemporary redefinitions. The argument is not always convincingly defended, as the justification is sometimes only based on contingent evidences that do not point to essential representational issues. However, these small shortcomings do not minimize the contributions of the book, which deserves to be read http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

<i>Changing Chinese Cities: The Potentials of Field Urbanism</i> by Renee Y. Chow (review)

China Review International, Volume 24 (2) – Jun 4, 2019

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews 113 embodiment of an internal and racialized Yellow Peril discourse. This suggests—still following Carrico but also as a conclusion derived from the global scenario sketched by the book as a whole—that we need to think beyond the East-West binary, and that many other binaries exist, including internal and apparently perplexing ones. Generally speaking, Yellow Perils is a remarkable, coherent, and recommendable work that offers an updated and at some moments innovative panoramic discourses about China from a contemporary perspective. Only regrettable is the absence of at least a chapter dealing with the reactions that the economic presence of China is arousing in Latin American countries, a region where Chinese investment has been as important as in Africa. Also, it might have been interesting to see how the book would have worked without the insistence, in almost each and every chapter, on the idea of an essential difference between traditional Yellow Peril discourses and their contemporary redefinitions. The argument is not always convincingly defended, as the justification is sometimes only based on contingent evidences that do not point to essential representational issues. However, these small shortcomings do not minimize the contributions of the book, which deserves to be read

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 4, 2019

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