<i>Buddhist Perspectives on Free Will: Agentless Agency?</i> ed. by Rick Repetti (review)

Buddhist Perspectives on Free Will: Agentless Agency? ed. by Rick Repetti (review) expressed in the theory of the three natures of reality. Although this position can be read as idealistic, Garfield understands it as primarily phenomenological (that is, as a claim about the structure of our experience). Taken in this way, he argues, the simile of the elephant, alongside a number of arguments put forth by Candrakīrti and Śāntarakṣita, support four alternative conclusions: that our phenomenological status resembles that of a brain in a vat, that our status is not that of a brain in a vat, that both claims are true, and that neither is true. The Madhyamaka and Yogācāra views exemplified in this philosophical move converge in concluding that the an- swer to the vat question must remain ineffable. The reason is that this hypothesis rests on a category mistake, erroneously presupposing an epistemic subject that is distinct from its object (contrary to the Yogācāra view) and that has an ultimately real referent (contrary to the Madhyamaka view). Both are merely conceptual-perceptual constructions. The themes covered by the remaining five chapters are: the development and consolidation of the terms pratītyasamutpāda and dharmadhātu in the Daśabhūmika Sūtra and in the Mādhyāntavibhāgabhāṣya (Suwanvarangkul); the polemics between the Yogācāra, the Madhyamaka-Svātantrika, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

<i>Buddhist Perspectives on Free Will: Agentless Agency?</i> ed. by Rick Repetti (review)

Philosophy East and West, Volume 68 (2) – Apr 10, 2018

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

expressed in the theory of the three natures of reality. Although this position can be read as idealistic, Garfield understands it as primarily phenomenological (that is, as a claim about the structure of our experience). Taken in this way, he argues, the simile of the elephant, alongside a number of arguments put forth by Candrakīrti and Śāntarakṣita, support four alternative conclusions: that our phenomenological status resembles that of a brain in a vat, that our status is not that of a brain in a vat, that both claims are true, and that neither is true. The Madhyamaka and Yogācāra views exemplified in this philosophical move converge in concluding that the an- swer to the vat question must remain ineffable. The reason is that this hypothesis rests on a category mistake, erroneously presupposing an epistemic subject that is distinct from its object (contrary to the Yogācāra view) and that has an ultimately real referent (contrary to the Madhyamaka view). Both are merely conceptual-perceptual constructions. The themes covered by the remaining five chapters are: the development and consolidation of the terms pratītyasamutpāda and dharmadhātu in the Daśabhūmika Sūtra and in the Mādhyāntavibhāgabhāṣya (Suwanvarangkul); the polemics between the Yogācāra, the Madhyamaka-Svātantrika, and

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 10, 2018

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