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Born Again: Evangelicalism in Korea (review)

Born Again: Evangelicalism in Korea (review) Journal of Korean Religions 3/2 2012 what he considered original Confucianism. In other words, he remained a Confucian, but one who continued to utilize Catholic concepts when they suited his Confucian purposes. A more nuanced presentation of Tasan’s political writings would have pointed out that Tasan did not believe in democracy, in the sense of a represen- tative government, but instead believed in a responsible government, one that took seriously its paternalistic obligation to promote the Confucian goal of the common good. Nor did he believe in social equality, in the sense of everyone having the same rights and obligations. Instead, he believed that Korea should be more like China, and allow men who were talented to rise to the top of the social hierarchy regardless of family background. Despite her sometimes contradictory statements, which could confuse some readers, Kim has nonetheless given the Western world a comprehensive over- view of the philosophy of one of pre-modern Korea’s most original thinkers. She deserves our gratitude for increasing awareness outside of Korea of one of the greatest minds that country has ever produced. Don Baker Professor, Department of Asian Studies University of British Columbia Born Again: Evangelicalism in Korea. By http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Religions University of Hawai'I Press

Born Again: Evangelicalism in Korea (review)

Journal of Korean Religions , Volume 3 (2) – Nov 23, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Institute for the Study of Religion, Sogang University, Korea
ISSN
2093-7288
eISSN
2167-2040

Abstract

Journal of Korean Religions 3/2 2012 what he considered original Confucianism. In other words, he remained a Confucian, but one who continued to utilize Catholic concepts when they suited his Confucian purposes. A more nuanced presentation of Tasan’s political writings would have pointed out that Tasan did not believe in democracy, in the sense of a represen- tative government, but instead believed in a responsible government, one that took seriously its paternalistic obligation to promote the Confucian goal of the common good. Nor did he believe in social equality, in the sense of everyone having the same rights and obligations. Instead, he believed that Korea should be more like China, and allow men who were talented to rise to the top of the social hierarchy regardless of family background. Despite her sometimes contradictory statements, which could confuse some readers, Kim has nonetheless given the Western world a comprehensive over- view of the philosophy of one of pre-modern Korea’s most original thinkers. She deserves our gratitude for increasing awareness outside of Korea of one of the greatest minds that country has ever produced. Don Baker Professor, Department of Asian Studies University of British Columbia Born Again: Evangelicalism in Korea. By

Journal

Journal of Korean ReligionsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 23, 2012

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