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Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen: Nature, Knowledge, Imagery in an Ancient Chinese Text (review)

Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen: Nature, Knowledge, Imagery in an Ancient Chinese Text (review) volved, then we will automatically respond so as to produce the well-being of all others, even at the expense of our own. I am not overly optimistic about Graham's solution to this problem. Graham, like the Taoists, assumes that people will always tend spontaneously toward what will produce a more ``flourishing'' consequence. While I believe that this is a general, and indeed a natural human tendency, I do not believe that it is universal. There is no denying that people have their destructive moments, and there is no denying that some people seem generally to have highly destructive tendencies. It is far from obvious to me that an increased understanding of the destructive consequences of their behavior would incite them to change their behavior. The collection closes with a Colophon by Harold Roth, ``An Appraisal of Angus Graham's Textual Scholarship on the Chuang Tzu,'' in which he engages in a detailed analysis and assessment of Graham's scholarship on the Chuang Tzu. Roth begins by noticing that Graham's translation is quite eccentric in its editing and arrangement of the text. Graham provides detailed arguments in justification of his editing and restructuring, using the methods of textual criticism of traditional http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen: Nature, Knowledge, Imagery in an Ancient Chinese Text (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 55 (1) – Dec 30, 2005

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1529-1898
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Abstract

volved, then we will automatically respond so as to produce the well-being of all others, even at the expense of our own. I am not overly optimistic about Graham's solution to this problem. Graham, like the Taoists, assumes that people will always tend spontaneously toward what will produce a more ``flourishing'' consequence. While I believe that this is a general, and indeed a natural human tendency, I do not believe that it is universal. There is no denying that people have their destructive moments, and there is no denying that some people seem generally to have highly destructive tendencies. It is far from obvious to me that an increased understanding of the destructive consequences of their behavior would incite them to change their behavior. The collection closes with a Colophon by Harold Roth, ``An Appraisal of Angus Graham's Textual Scholarship on the Chuang Tzu,'' in which he engages in a detailed analysis and assessment of Graham's scholarship on the Chuang Tzu. Roth begins by noticing that Graham's translation is quite eccentric in its editing and arrangement of the text. Graham provides detailed arguments in justification of his editing and restructuring, using the methods of textual criticism of traditional

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 30, 2005

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