Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Houses Far From Home: British Colonial Space in the New Hebrides (review)

Houses Far From Home: British Colonial Space in the New Hebrides (review) the contemporary pacific · fall 2002 the anthropologist moved. The introductory chapter appropriately sets a reflexive tone and suggests that the mobility of the bamboo house prefigures the future methodological mobility of its anthropologist. Rodman travels to multiple sites in Vanuatu and in England as she gathers family histories, memories, stories, photographs, maps, and diagrams of the past and present, simultaneously inserting fragments of her own travelogue and methodologically actualizing multilocal fieldwork practices. Hers is also a personal journey, sometimes in the company of former colonial officer Will Stober, as she tracks down former inhabitants in their homes in Herefordshire and Somerset, visits the remnants of colonially significant New Hebridean sites, such as the Tanna church and Independence Park, and seeks the archival materials and documents that such an ethnographic history demands. Five other houses tell different kinds of stories and produce different kinds of data. They are the British Residency, the Prison, the White House and British Paddock, the Tanna district agent's house, and the remains of the island house on Venui off Santo's coast. Especially informative for the histories they reveal are the resident commissioner's British Residency on the summit of Irikiriki in Port Vila (Efate), http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Houses Far From Home: British Colonial Space in the New Hebrides (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 14 (2) – Jan 7, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/houses-far-from-home-british-colonial-space-in-the-new-hebrides-review-5cSdl6S4Bf
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2002 the anthropologist moved. The introductory chapter appropriately sets a reflexive tone and suggests that the mobility of the bamboo house prefigures the future methodological mobility of its anthropologist. Rodman travels to multiple sites in Vanuatu and in England as she gathers family histories, memories, stories, photographs, maps, and diagrams of the past and present, simultaneously inserting fragments of her own travelogue and methodologically actualizing multilocal fieldwork practices. Hers is also a personal journey, sometimes in the company of former colonial officer Will Stober, as she tracks down former inhabitants in their homes in Herefordshire and Somerset, visits the remnants of colonially significant New Hebridean sites, such as the Tanna church and Independence Park, and seeks the archival materials and documents that such an ethnographic history demands. Five other houses tell different kinds of stories and produce different kinds of data. They are the British Residency, the Prison, the White House and British Paddock, the Tanna district agent's house, and the remains of the island house on Venui off Santo's coast. Especially informative for the histories they reveal are the resident commissioner's British Residency on the summit of Irikiriki in Port Vila (Efate),

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 7, 2002

There are no references for this article.