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Hope at Sea: Possible Ecologies in Oceanic Literature by Teresa Shewry (review)

Hope at Sea: Possible Ecologies in Oceanic Literature by Teresa Shewry (review) book and media reviews uncompromising ambiguity, the pace of the movie, at least for me, is slow. At 93 minutes, it is too long by onethird for the classroom, where it might be put to good use in courses on the environment, Mori studies, and, of course, Pacific ethnology. I would urge the director to release a re-edited version, one hour long, which would be much more manageable for teaching purposes. pollution, climate change, overfishing, water diversion, and water shortages, the authors that Shewry selects model hopeful possibilities for thinking about ecological futures. In approaching Oceanian literatures, she limits herself primarily to writers living in anglophone settler colonies--Hawai`i (Michael McPherson, Mhealani Dudoit, Gary Pak, Cathy Song, Robert Barclay); Aotearoa/New Zealand (Hone Tuwhare, Kerry Hulme, Cilla McQueen, Ralph Hotere, Albert Wendt, Ian Wedde); and Australia (Richard Flanagan). While Shewry marks the positionalities of these authors and notes their connections to social movements, settler colonialism itself is largely bracketed as the contentious sociopolitical setting out of which most of the texts she discusses have emerged. To the degree that native-settler relations are discussed, it is in terms of their alliances and the shared senses found in environmental writing of "threatened, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Hope at Sea: Possible Ecologies in Oceanic Literature by Teresa Shewry (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 29 (1) – Jan 21, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews uncompromising ambiguity, the pace of the movie, at least for me, is slow. At 93 minutes, it is too long by onethird for the classroom, where it might be put to good use in courses on the environment, Mori studies, and, of course, Pacific ethnology. I would urge the director to release a re-edited version, one hour long, which would be much more manageable for teaching purposes. pollution, climate change, overfishing, water diversion, and water shortages, the authors that Shewry selects model hopeful possibilities for thinking about ecological futures. In approaching Oceanian literatures, she limits herself primarily to writers living in anglophone settler colonies--Hawai`i (Michael McPherson, Mhealani Dudoit, Gary Pak, Cathy Song, Robert Barclay); Aotearoa/New Zealand (Hone Tuwhare, Kerry Hulme, Cilla McQueen, Ralph Hotere, Albert Wendt, Ian Wedde); and Australia (Richard Flanagan). While Shewry marks the positionalities of these authors and notes their connections to social movements, settler colonialism itself is largely bracketed as the contentious sociopolitical setting out of which most of the texts she discusses have emerged. To the degree that native-settler relations are discussed, it is in terms of their alliances and the shared senses found in environmental writing of "threatened,

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 21, 2017

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