Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Homosexuality and Civilization (review)

Homosexuality and Civilization (review) journal of world history, december 2004 narratives in less than two hundred pages. Both make considerable demands on the reader. Cowen's book is appealing in that his vision includes cultural and religious as well as economic factors, but is more successful in his first sections. Marks's book has a strong emphasis on economic factors and Western coercion and exploitation and has a clearer analytical framework. Closely accompanied by lecture and discussion, it could be used to frame a world history course for the period after 1400. david ringrose University of California, San Diego Homosexuality and Civilization. By louis crompton. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2003. 623 pp. $35.00 (cloth). This exquisitely weighty tome is less comprehensive than its name suggests. It gives little attention to ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia or to homosexuality within Islamic civilization, except in passing in the section on Arab Spain (pp. 161­172); virtually ignores South Asia on the grounds that "Hindu teachings on sex still remain largely unexplored" (p. 213); and devotes only seven pages (pp. 314­320) to New World peoples (mostly Caribs and Mayans, with slight allusion to the Inca) from the eyes of the Conquistadores. Concluding curiously in the year 1810 (when http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Homosexuality and Civilization (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 15 (4)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/homosexuality-and-civilization-review-D0hKSS7bzB
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

journal of world history, december 2004 narratives in less than two hundred pages. Both make considerable demands on the reader. Cowen's book is appealing in that his vision includes cultural and religious as well as economic factors, but is more successful in his first sections. Marks's book has a strong emphasis on economic factors and Western coercion and exploitation and has a clearer analytical framework. Closely accompanied by lecture and discussion, it could be used to frame a world history course for the period after 1400. david ringrose University of California, San Diego Homosexuality and Civilization. By louis crompton. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2003. 623 pp. $35.00 (cloth). This exquisitely weighty tome is less comprehensive than its name suggests. It gives little attention to ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia or to homosexuality within Islamic civilization, except in passing in the section on Arab Spain (pp. 161­172); virtually ignores South Asia on the grounds that "Hindu teachings on sex still remain largely unexplored" (p. 213); and devotes only seven pages (pp. 314­320) to New World peoples (mostly Caribs and Mayans, with slight allusion to the Inca) from the eyes of the Conquistadores. Concluding curiously in the year 1810 (when

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

There are no references for this article.