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Homealani (review)

Homealani (review) the contemporary pacific · 23:1 (2011) who lived during a time of tremendous cultural, social, economic, and political change in his native Hawai`i. He was born in 1899, a year after the illegal annexation of the islands by the United States, and he witnessed the transition of Hawai`i from US territory to its eventual designation as the fiftieth state in the union in 1959. During that time, Kupau sought to adapt to changing circumstances while never forgetting his Native Hawaiian roots. Kupau's experiences mirror those of many other Hawaiians who had to negotiate between their mother culture and the introduced culture of the United States. It is this universal feature of the film that enables audiences--in particular those of Native Hawaiian descent--to identify with Kupau's life, whether through their own firsthand experiences or through the stories of family members. Indeed, at a 2009 screening of the film at Kamehameha Schools--a private school for Native Hawaiian youth where Kupau was a student in the early 1900s--several elderly audience members stood up at the end to relay their own experiences of having to maneuver between two cultures. This powerful moment of collective remembering underscored the fact that Homealani is not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 23:1 (2011) who lived during a time of tremendous cultural, social, economic, and political change in his native Hawai`i. He was born in 1899, a year after the illegal annexation of the islands by the United States, and he witnessed the transition of Hawai`i from US territory to its eventual designation as the fiftieth state in the union in 1959. During that time, Kupau sought to adapt to changing circumstances while never forgetting his Native Hawaiian roots. Kupau's experiences mirror those of many other Hawaiians who had to negotiate between their mother culture and the introduced culture of the United States. It is this universal feature of the film that enables audiences--in particular those of Native Hawaiian descent--to identify with Kupau's life, whether through their own firsthand experiences or through the stories of family members. Indeed, at a 2009 screening of the film at Kamehameha Schools--a private school for Native Hawaiian youth where Kupau was a student in the early 1900s--several elderly audience members stood up at the end to relay their own experiences of having to maneuver between two cultures. This powerful moment of collective remembering underscored the fact that Homealani is not

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 26, 2011

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