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Hills of Sacrifice: The 5th RCT in Korea (review)

Hills of Sacrifice: The 5th RCT in Korea (review) korean studies, vol. 26, no. 2 pact of the two wars on the domestic politics of the great powers. Ellen Schrecker and Stephen Whitfield examine the McCarthy era in the United States and its relationship to the Korean War. Jennifer Roberts compares "Warfare, Democracy, and the Cult of Personality" with particular reference to Alcibiades and Douglas MacArthur. Her discussion of the tension between flamboyant heroes and democratic egalitarianism is adroit, although it seems a stretch to compare Truman's relief of MacArthur over insubordination to the ensnaring of Alcibiades over issues of religious orthodoxy. The final section of the book deals with cultural aspects of the wars. Josiah Ober contrasts Thucydides' theoretical approach with the actual course of historical events that he recounts. Kurt Raaflaub provides an informative and appealing examination of Athenian attitudes toward war reflected in the architecture and literature of the time, using Socrates and Polymarchus's dawn stroll through Piraeus and Athens mentioned at the beginning of Plato's Republic. Raaflaub identifies the sights the two would have encountered and uses these as a mechanism to examine the social, economic, political, and psychological influences on Athenian views of war. He then speculates on the mental universe of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Hills of Sacrifice: The 5th RCT in Korea (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 26 (2) – Dec 3, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1529
Publisher site
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Abstract

korean studies, vol. 26, no. 2 pact of the two wars on the domestic politics of the great powers. Ellen Schrecker and Stephen Whitfield examine the McCarthy era in the United States and its relationship to the Korean War. Jennifer Roberts compares "Warfare, Democracy, and the Cult of Personality" with particular reference to Alcibiades and Douglas MacArthur. Her discussion of the tension between flamboyant heroes and democratic egalitarianism is adroit, although it seems a stretch to compare Truman's relief of MacArthur over insubordination to the ensnaring of Alcibiades over issues of religious orthodoxy. The final section of the book deals with cultural aspects of the wars. Josiah Ober contrasts Thucydides' theoretical approach with the actual course of historical events that he recounts. Kurt Raaflaub provides an informative and appealing examination of Athenian attitudes toward war reflected in the architecture and literature of the time, using Socrates and Polymarchus's dawn stroll through Piraeus and Athens mentioned at the beginning of Plato's Republic. Raaflaub identifies the sights the two would have encountered and uses these as a mechanism to examine the social, economic, political, and psychological influences on Athenian views of war. He then speculates on the mental universe of

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 3, 2002

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