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Hijikata: Revolt of the Body by Stephen Barber (review)

Hijikata: Revolt of the Body by Stephen Barber (review) Book Reviews 625 ing genzai nō in terms of Aristotle’s Poetics that Smethurst discovered the three- person scene structure of certain tragedies. The dramatic effect of the distan- ciation in genzai nō is paralleled by three-person scenes in tragedy in which a third actor interrupts dialog between two other actors. This interruption happens in scenes that Aristotle marked as crucial to an outstanding tragedy. As Smethurst explains, “The use of that third character in the tragedy serves as a catalyst for a ‘sudden reversal of action’ (peripeteia), for the ‘recognition’ of two people one of the other or of each other (anagnorisis), or for some equally important step in the development of the plot, one that leads to a ‘fatal or painful action’ (pathos) committed or averted” (p. 79). The fourth chapter is largely an examination of this three-character structure in Oedipus the King and Iphigenia in Tauris. These plays, which Aristotle distinguishes as particularly successful, use the three-person dialog sparingly. However, the dramatic struc- ture is employed in the scenes from Oedipus the King and Iphigenia in Tauris that Aristotle points out as having outstanding plot structure. This last chapter focuses mainly on tragedy but shares insights that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Hijikata: Revolt of the Body by Stephen Barber (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 31 (2) – Sep 23, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

Book Reviews 625 ing genzai nō in terms of Aristotle’s Poetics that Smethurst discovered the three- person scene structure of certain tragedies. The dramatic effect of the distan- ciation in genzai nō is paralleled by three-person scenes in tragedy in which a third actor interrupts dialog between two other actors. This interruption happens in scenes that Aristotle marked as crucial to an outstanding tragedy. As Smethurst explains, “The use of that third character in the tragedy serves as a catalyst for a ‘sudden reversal of action’ (peripeteia), for the ‘recognition’ of two people one of the other or of each other (anagnorisis), or for some equally important step in the development of the plot, one that leads to a ‘fatal or painful action’ (pathos) committed or averted” (p. 79). The fourth chapter is largely an examination of this three-character structure in Oedipus the King and Iphigenia in Tauris. These plays, which Aristotle distinguishes as particularly successful, use the three-person dialog sparingly. However, the dramatic struc- ture is employed in the scenes from Oedipus the King and Iphigenia in Tauris that Aristotle points out as having outstanding plot structure. This last chapter focuses mainly on tragedy but shares insights that

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 23, 2014

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