Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Heirs to World Culture: Being Indonesian, 1950–1965 ed. by Jennifer Lindsay and Maya H. T. Liem (review)

Heirs to World Culture: Being Indonesian, 1950–1965 ed. by Jennifer Lindsay and Maya H. T. Liem... front of Suharto's guests. These facts problematize the gender issues or may mean that Central Java's situation, in which the author performed, did not represent the whole of the New Order cultural policy. The author attacks the UNESCO intangible cultural heritage policy (which was first implemented only after the Suharto government fell). Her perceptions of the program probably correspond to impacts in Central Java: "This policy distributes benefits only to highly select groups of people--most often those already chosen for the value they provide the state--and discourages attempts by practitioners themselves to reinterpret their own culture, history, or artistic practices, leading to a stagnation in time and place . . . , promoting stability through the silencing of dissent" (p. 24). While undoubtedly true, of course this outcome goes against the UNESCO guidelines, which argue that ownership should be in local communities. Situating problems in the government's implementation rather than the idea of the convention would of course be more measured. This book shares an interesting voice and big ideas about patriarchy and Central Javanese female court dance, which the author contrasts with "folk" forms like gambuh, the courtesan style of East Java. The insights arise out of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Heirs to World Culture: Being Indonesian, 1950–1965 ed. by Jennifer Lindsay and Maya H. T. Liem (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 32 (2) – Sep 14, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/heirs-to-world-culture-being-indonesian-1950-1965-ed-by-jennifer-9sVBfon2n0
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

front of Suharto's guests. These facts problematize the gender issues or may mean that Central Java's situation, in which the author performed, did not represent the whole of the New Order cultural policy. The author attacks the UNESCO intangible cultural heritage policy (which was first implemented only after the Suharto government fell). Her perceptions of the program probably correspond to impacts in Central Java: "This policy distributes benefits only to highly select groups of people--most often those already chosen for the value they provide the state--and discourages attempts by practitioners themselves to reinterpret their own culture, history, or artistic practices, leading to a stagnation in time and place . . . , promoting stability through the silencing of dissent" (p. 24). While undoubtedly true, of course this outcome goes against the UNESCO guidelines, which argue that ownership should be in local communities. Situating problems in the government's implementation rather than the idea of the convention would of course be more measured. This book shares an interesting voice and big ideas about patriarchy and Central Javanese female court dance, which the author contrasts with "folk" forms like gambuh, the courtesan style of East Java. The insights arise out of

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 14, 2015

There are no references for this article.