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He Nae Ākea: Bound Together (review)

He Nae Ākea: Bound Together (review) the contemporary pacific · 29:1 (2017) chapter, Kirch admits his privilege as a white male researcher from an elite university and emphasizes the slow transition to the equitable inclusion of female and indigenous researchers in an unenviable and struggling research environment. My only criticism of this book is the absence of comments on the future of Pacific Islands archaeology, given Kirch's vast experience. I was intrigued by his quaint references to the past when life was simpler, before 1984 when his Kaypro-4/84 computer creaked into the digital revolution. Many of his students, some of whom I have collaborated with, are able to work on the islands after exchanging hundreds of e-mails and scrolling through Islanders' Facebook pages. We now get to work with full-fledged indigenous researchers who open up numerous different ideas and angles for research. We work with communities who have very different ideas about the past, including some who fight for cultural heritage protection against the rampages of development as a remnant of the colonial past. ing their teddy bears with them at all times in the field. To the aspiring student of Pacific Islands archaeology, for whom I think it is mainly intended, this book http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

He Nae Ākea: Bound Together (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 29 (1) – Jan 21, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 29:1 (2017) chapter, Kirch admits his privilege as a white male researcher from an elite university and emphasizes the slow transition to the equitable inclusion of female and indigenous researchers in an unenviable and struggling research environment. My only criticism of this book is the absence of comments on the future of Pacific Islands archaeology, given Kirch's vast experience. I was intrigued by his quaint references to the past when life was simpler, before 1984 when his Kaypro-4/84 computer creaked into the digital revolution. Many of his students, some of whom I have collaborated with, are able to work on the islands after exchanging hundreds of e-mails and scrolling through Islanders' Facebook pages. We now get to work with full-fledged indigenous researchers who open up numerous different ideas and angles for research. We work with communities who have very different ideas about the past, including some who fight for cultural heritage protection against the rampages of development as a remnant of the colonial past. ing their teddy bears with them at all times in the field. To the aspiring student of Pacific Islands archaeology, for whom I think it is mainly intended, this book

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 21, 2017

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