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"Hawaiian at Heart" and Other Fictions

"Hawaiian at Heart" and Other Fictions Lisa Kahaleole Hall Who’s a Hawaiian? When the Hawaiian people lost our national sovereignty through the ille- gal invasion and overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawai‘i in 1893 and our subsequent annexation by the United States of America in 1898, we also lost control over the meaning of “Hawaiian” identity. In the forcible trans- formation from nation to American colony to American state, the mean- ing of “Hawaiian” became ambiguous, as residents of the Territory of Hawai‘i, and then of the state, began to be called “Hawaiian” along with the indigenous Hawaiian people. The terms “Native Hawaiian” and “Känaka Maoli” are often used today to ensure accurate recognition of who is being discussed, but “Native Hawaiian” carries its own colonial baggage. In 1993, on the 100th anniversary of the overthrow, the United States Congress issued a Joint Senate Resolution apologizing for the US role in the overthrow and admitting that “the indigenous Hawaiian people never directly relinquished their claims to their inherent sovereignty as a people or over their national lands to the United States, either through their mon- archy or through a plebiscite or referendum.” President Bill Clinton signed the measure on 23 November 1993 as Public Law http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

"Hawaiian at Heart" and Other Fictions

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 17 (2) – Jul 29, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

Lisa Kahaleole Hall Who’s a Hawaiian? When the Hawaiian people lost our national sovereignty through the ille- gal invasion and overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawai‘i in 1893 and our subsequent annexation by the United States of America in 1898, we also lost control over the meaning of “Hawaiian” identity. In the forcible trans- formation from nation to American colony to American state, the mean- ing of “Hawaiian” became ambiguous, as residents of the Territory of Hawai‘i, and then of the state, began to be called “Hawaiian” along with the indigenous Hawaiian people. The terms “Native Hawaiian” and “Känaka Maoli” are often used today to ensure accurate recognition of who is being discussed, but “Native Hawaiian” carries its own colonial baggage. In 1993, on the 100th anniversary of the overthrow, the United States Congress issued a Joint Senate Resolution apologizing for the US role in the overthrow and admitting that “the indigenous Hawaiian people never directly relinquished their claims to their inherent sovereignty as a people or over their national lands to the United States, either through their mon- archy or through a plebiscite or referendum.” President Bill Clinton signed the measure on 23 November 1993 as Public Law

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 29, 2005

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