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Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War (review)

Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War (review) journal of world history, december 2010 through positive engagement, he argues, can the Church advance a brand of Christian humanism that can positively influence the world and make the Catholic faith more broadly compelling. He credits Asian Church leaders with setting a positive tone for such dialogue by emphasizing respect for cultures that Christianity has historically not permeated. Yet he charges Vatican authorities--especially Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, later Pope Benedict XVI--with an outmoded, defensive, narrowly European understanding of "Catholic culture" that inhibits the potential to reach across enduring divides. Regardless, he says, "the days of the old Eurocentric Church directed by Europeans are numbered" (p. 282). With the dramatic decline of Catholic identification among post­World War II Europeans, it is clear to Linden that developments in Asia, Africa, and Latin America will determine the contours of Church history in the decades to come. james p. mccartin Seton Hall University Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War. By grace m. cho. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008. 232 pp. $67.50 (cloth); $22.50 (paper). South Korea and its citizens emerged from the devastation of the Korean War, and with the economic and military aid from the United States, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 21 (4) – Feb 3, 2010

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, december 2010 through positive engagement, he argues, can the Church advance a brand of Christian humanism that can positively influence the world and make the Catholic faith more broadly compelling. He credits Asian Church leaders with setting a positive tone for such dialogue by emphasizing respect for cultures that Christianity has historically not permeated. Yet he charges Vatican authorities--especially Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, later Pope Benedict XVI--with an outmoded, defensive, narrowly European understanding of "Catholic culture" that inhibits the potential to reach across enduring divides. Regardless, he says, "the days of the old Eurocentric Church directed by Europeans are numbered" (p. 282). With the dramatic decline of Catholic identification among post­World War II Europeans, it is clear to Linden that developments in Asia, Africa, and Latin America will determine the contours of Church history in the decades to come. james p. mccartin Seton Hall University Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War. By grace m. cho. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008. 232 pp. $67.50 (cloth); $22.50 (paper). South Korea and its citizens emerged from the devastation of the Korean War, and with the economic and military aid from the United States,

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 3, 2010

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