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Handle With Care: Ownership and Control of Ethnographic Materials (review)

Handle With Care: Ownership and Control of Ethnographic Materials (review) the contemporary pacific · fall 2004 significant presences. Perhaps the overtly masculine nature of the topic (eg, Helm's disappearance, the syndicate, the world of surfing) makes for a rather masculine text, not to mention the highly gendered nature of detective fiction in general. As in Speed, the strength of this novel is its perspective on class politics, and it is Kanani, after all, who voices this significant critique (96). All in all, Morales's When the Shark Bites is definitely worth reading and reading again. Kanani, Henry, and their children are beautifully and sensitively rendered. Passages that stay with this reader include the young `Analu's story of Grampa Wong and the lovebird, Mäkena's account of the surf party in "The Runner-up," and the small-time criminal Sparkey Lopez's harrowing account of his betrayal by the gangster Harley Evans. Lopez's voice in "The Ultimate Salesman" recounts how his own high-school antics--his dumping fundraiser sweetbread and paper flowers at Bellows Beach-- return in his adulthood in ironic ways, with his having to dispose of a dead body for Harley Evans. Like Mackie who dumps a corpse in the river, Sparkey dumps the body weighed down by a bag of cement in a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Handle With Care: Ownership and Control of Ethnographic Materials (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 16 (2) – Aug 31, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2004 significant presences. Perhaps the overtly masculine nature of the topic (eg, Helm's disappearance, the syndicate, the world of surfing) makes for a rather masculine text, not to mention the highly gendered nature of detective fiction in general. As in Speed, the strength of this novel is its perspective on class politics, and it is Kanani, after all, who voices this significant critique (96). All in all, Morales's When the Shark Bites is definitely worth reading and reading again. Kanani, Henry, and their children are beautifully and sensitively rendered. Passages that stay with this reader include the young `Analu's story of Grampa Wong and the lovebird, Mäkena's account of the surf party in "The Runner-up," and the small-time criminal Sparkey Lopez's harrowing account of his betrayal by the gangster Harley Evans. Lopez's voice in "The Ultimate Salesman" recounts how his own high-school antics--his dumping fundraiser sweetbread and paper flowers at Bellows Beach-- return in his adulthood in ironic ways, with his having to dispose of a dead body for Harley Evans. Like Mackie who dumps a corpse in the river, Sparkey dumps the body weighed down by a bag of cement in a

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 31, 2004

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