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Haiku: This Other World (review)

Haiku: This Other World (review) The ghost o f the mother is not laid to rest, and only in the alternate reality of dreams could life have been happier. All the girl of Þve wanted was for her mother to give her one simple thingÑlove. But she didnÕt, and that has made all the dif- ference . k e e t h u a n c h y e Haiku: This Other World by Richard Wright . Edited by Yoshinobu Hakutani and Robert L. Tener. New York: Arcade Publishers, 1998. 320 pages, cloth $23.50. Richard Wrigh t, author of Black Boy and Native So n, was living in exile in Paris and facing death when he began to write haiku. So deep was his connection and so strong his commitment to the form that he composed over four thousand verses during the Þnal eighteen months of his life. In the ÒmathematicalÓ syllable count of haiku he found an emotional net, and in the deep connection with nature a mir- ror for the seasons of the soul . According to his daughter Julia, who introduces Haiku: This Other World, his haiku were Òself-developed antidotes against illnessÓ and his Òbreaking down words into syllables matched the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Haiku: This Other World (review)

Manoa , Volume 13 (2) – Oct 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x

Abstract

The ghost o f the mother is not laid to rest, and only in the alternate reality of dreams could life have been happier. All the girl of Þve wanted was for her mother to give her one simple thingÑlove. But she didnÕt, and that has made all the dif- ference . k e e t h u a n c h y e Haiku: This Other World by Richard Wright . Edited by Yoshinobu Hakutani and Robert L. Tener. New York: Arcade Publishers, 1998. 320 pages, cloth $23.50. Richard Wrigh t, author of Black Boy and Native So n, was living in exile in Paris and facing death when he began to write haiku. So deep was his connection and so strong his commitment to the form that he composed over four thousand verses during the Þnal eighteen months of his life. In the ÒmathematicalÓ syllable count of haiku he found an emotional net, and in the deep connection with nature a mir- ror for the seasons of the soul . According to his daughter Julia, who introduces Haiku: This Other World, his haiku were Òself-developed antidotes against illnessÓ and his Òbreaking down words into syllables matched the

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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