Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Haiku and Analysis: Ryokan and Whitehead

Haiku and Analysis: Ryokan and Whitehead Tokiyuki Nobuhara Keiwa College, Japan (emeritus) Ryokan is famous for his haiku below: taku hodo wa kaze ga motekuru ochiba kana for my fire the wind brings enough fallen leaves I believe there is manifestly in Ryokan's wind poem his faith in the Grace supporting his life and career as a mendicant friar. You could compare this haiku with the last sentence in Alfred North Whitehead's magnum opus, Process and Reality: "In this way, the insistent craving is justified--the insistent craving that zest for existence be refreshed by the ever-present, unfading importance of our immediate actions, which perish and yet live for evermore."1 According to my Whiteheadian wind theology, there are four types of wind: wind of Grace; wind of Understanding; wind of Adventure; and wind of Compassion, which very interestingly correspond to Whitehead's famous four creative phases,2 which might be expressed in my own way in terms of No bodies language (in the sense that we exist insofar as Nothingness negates itself (No ) in such a way that we exist physically in ourselves (être-en-soi) ( bodies). Accordingly, the four types of wind might be expressed as follows: wind of Grace: No bodies wind of Understanding: No http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Haiku and Analysis: Ryokan and Whitehead

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 34 (1) – Feb 3, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/haiku-and-analysis-ryokan-and-whitehead-ioCdB2tARS
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Tokiyuki Nobuhara Keiwa College, Japan (emeritus) Ryokan is famous for his haiku below: taku hodo wa kaze ga motekuru ochiba kana for my fire the wind brings enough fallen leaves I believe there is manifestly in Ryokan's wind poem his faith in the Grace supporting his life and career as a mendicant friar. You could compare this haiku with the last sentence in Alfred North Whitehead's magnum opus, Process and Reality: "In this way, the insistent craving is justified--the insistent craving that zest for existence be refreshed by the ever-present, unfading importance of our immediate actions, which perish and yet live for evermore."1 According to my Whiteheadian wind theology, there are four types of wind: wind of Grace; wind of Understanding; wind of Adventure; and wind of Compassion, which very interestingly correspond to Whitehead's famous four creative phases,2 which might be expressed in my own way in terms of No bodies language (in the sense that we exist insofar as Nothingness negates itself (No ) in such a way that we exist physically in ourselves (être-en-soi) ( bodies). Accordingly, the four types of wind might be expressed as follows: wind of Grace: No bodies wind of Understanding: No

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 3, 2014

There are no references for this article.