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Guam

Guam Micronesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2009 Reviews of Kiribati and Nauru are not included in this issue. Federated States of Micronesia In his inaugural address two years ago, President Emanuel "Manny" Mori announced to the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) public that cultural preservation was a top priority for him, and this year has seen his administration move ahead on this promise. In my analysis of this issue in last year's review, I pointed out that the power of each constituent state to preserve its own cultures is the very essence of FSM federalism (Haglelgam 2009, 115). When the national government elevated the Office of Historic and Cultural Preservation to the level of the cabinet early in the Mori administration, it seemed to violate the spirit of federalism embodied in the national constitution. The impracticality of having the national government control cultural preservation is one reason the national constitution delegates this responsibility to the states. It is more efficient for the people of each state to preserve their own culture or cultures because they know their cultures best, whereas others may rely on stereotypes or misinformation. Both President Mori and Vice http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-9464
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Abstract

Micronesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2009 Reviews of Kiribati and Nauru are not included in this issue. Federated States of Micronesia In his inaugural address two years ago, President Emanuel "Manny" Mori announced to the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) public that cultural preservation was a top priority for him, and this year has seen his administration move ahead on this promise. In my analysis of this issue in last year's review, I pointed out that the power of each constituent state to preserve its own cultures is the very essence of FSM federalism (Haglelgam 2009, 115). When the national government elevated the Office of Historic and Cultural Preservation to the level of the cabinet early in the Mori administration, it seemed to violate the spirit of federalism embodied in the national constitution. The impracticality of having the national government control cultural preservation is one reason the national constitution delegates this responsibility to the states. It is more efficient for the people of each state to preserve their own culture or cultures because they know their cultures best, whereas others may rely on stereotypes or misinformation. Both President Mori and Vice

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 21, 2010

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