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Guam

Guam Micronesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2003 to 30 June 2004 Reviews of the Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, and Nauru are not included in this issue. The many ongoing issues and problems during the year under review included recovery from natural disaster, preservation of culture, allegations of government corruption, budget cuts, the struggle to lead the economy onto a healthier path, and escalating youth violence. The people of Guam showed their resilience, forging ahead, helping those on and off island, and celebrating the successes of community members. In December 2003, a year after typhoon Pongsona, millions of dollars of repairs had yet to be done. Hundreds of individuals on island still lacked power and water. There were other infrastructural woes as well, many of which were long-standing. New construction, storm activity, and unchecked vegetation growth contributed to the flooding of roads, bridges, and properties (PDN, 17 May 2004). Despite the abundance of water in some locales, other parts of the island, especially in the south, suffered another year of continuous water supply outages. Guam's cultural crops and wildlife took some hits. As of May 2004, onefourth of the island's betel nut trees, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Micronesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2003 to 30 June 2004 Reviews of the Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, and Nauru are not included in this issue. The many ongoing issues and problems during the year under review included recovery from natural disaster, preservation of culture, allegations of government corruption, budget cuts, the struggle to lead the economy onto a healthier path, and escalating youth violence. The people of Guam showed their resilience, forging ahead, helping those on and off island, and celebrating the successes of community members. In December 2003, a year after typhoon Pongsona, millions of dollars of repairs had yet to be done. Hundreds of individuals on island still lacked power and water. There were other infrastructural woes as well, many of which were long-standing. New construction, storm activity, and unchecked vegetation growth contributed to the flooding of roads, bridges, and properties (PDN, 17 May 2004). Despite the abundance of water in some locales, other parts of the island, especially in the south, suffered another year of continuous water supply outages. Guam's cultural crops and wildlife took some hits. As of May 2004, onefourth of the island's betel nut trees,

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 27, 2005

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