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Government by the Gun: The Unfinished Business of Fiji's 2000 Coup (review)

Government by the Gun: The Unfinished Business of Fiji's 2000 Coup (review) book and media reviews cherish and refer to repeatedly in the course of their undergraduate and postgraduate studies. It is an excellent point of reference for thinking about and reflecting on the region's pasts. Teachers will welcome its attempt to debunk the widely held view that history is about nothing more than dates and dead white men. History is projected as more than a product to memorize, more than a set of facts collected and organized by others that one dutifully learns in order to be conversant with times past or to affirm a connection to those now dead. Rather, history-telling in this book becomes an active, participatory process (28). It invigorates the present. It affirms who we are by describing what we have been and it inspires what we may yet become. This book's readability will encourage readers from a variety of backgrounds and interests (including anthropology, cultural studies, literature, political studies, and, of course, history) to weave their own narratives and develop further conversations across our many shared experiences and differences. Readers will also appreciate the delicate tandem between the "how" (theory and historiography) and the "what" (content) of Pacific history that Borofsky has successfully orchestrated. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Government by the Gun: The Unfinished Business of Fiji's 2000 Coup (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 15 (1) – Feb 10, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

book and media reviews cherish and refer to repeatedly in the course of their undergraduate and postgraduate studies. It is an excellent point of reference for thinking about and reflecting on the region's pasts. Teachers will welcome its attempt to debunk the widely held view that history is about nothing more than dates and dead white men. History is projected as more than a product to memorize, more than a set of facts collected and organized by others that one dutifully learns in order to be conversant with times past or to affirm a connection to those now dead. Rather, history-telling in this book becomes an active, participatory process (28). It invigorates the present. It affirms who we are by describing what we have been and it inspires what we may yet become. This book's readability will encourage readers from a variety of backgrounds and interests (including anthropology, cultural studies, literature, political studies, and, of course, history) to weave their own narratives and develop further conversations across our many shared experiences and differences. Readers will also appreciate the delicate tandem between the "how" (theory and historiography) and the "what" (content) of Pacific history that Borofsky has successfully orchestrated.

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 10, 2003

There are no references for this article.