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Gossip and the Everyday Production of Politics (review)

Gossip and the Everyday Production of Politics (review) book and media reviews areas, and overseas treatment schemes, unless donor funded, eat up healthsector budgets. Keeping professionally qualified health staff in remote rural areas is a challenge for all Pacific Island states, where not only nationals may refuse to serve but also doctors recruited from other developing countries. In some states this is related to poor governance, where health centers and rural hospitals have been allowed to become dilapidated, lacking drugs and equipment, with staff salaries sporadically paid. The book explores in detail how skilled health workers make decisions to migrate or remain at home and provides a number of illustrative case studies from the survey on the options and dilemmas of skilled health workers. Family considerations are prominent in many of these accounts, particularly among Islander nurses; by staying they may directly care for their families but by going they may provide them with material support. Some choose both options, alternately working abroad and at home. Connell critically examines the various policy options open to Pacific Islands governments, such as the rationing of training by offering less internationally marketable credentials, offering salary supplements, improving workplaces, and bonding graduates trained in health sciences abroad. Should small Island http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Gossip and the Everyday Production of Politics (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 23 (1) – Mar 26, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews areas, and overseas treatment schemes, unless donor funded, eat up healthsector budgets. Keeping professionally qualified health staff in remote rural areas is a challenge for all Pacific Island states, where not only nationals may refuse to serve but also doctors recruited from other developing countries. In some states this is related to poor governance, where health centers and rural hospitals have been allowed to become dilapidated, lacking drugs and equipment, with staff salaries sporadically paid. The book explores in detail how skilled health workers make decisions to migrate or remain at home and provides a number of illustrative case studies from the survey on the options and dilemmas of skilled health workers. Family considerations are prominent in many of these accounts, particularly among Islander nurses; by staying they may directly care for their families but by going they may provide them with material support. Some choose both options, alternately working abroad and at home. Connell critically examines the various policy options open to Pacific Islands governments, such as the rationing of training by offering less internationally marketable credentials, offering salary supplements, improving workplaces, and bonding graduates trained in health sciences abroad. Should small Island

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 26, 2011

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