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Gorbachev's Revolution (review)

Gorbachev's Revolution (review) Gorbachev's Revolution. By anthony d'agostino. New York: New York University Press, 1998. Pp. ix + 384. $50 (cloth). In the years following Mikhail Sergeevich Gorbachev's rise to power as general secretary of the Communist Party in 1985, a veritable sea change has swept across the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe, generating an ever growing body of academic and popular literature that seeks to assess the "Gorbachev revolution." One of the newest contributions to these writings is Anthony D'Agostino's Gorbachev's Revolution, which builds on the author's earlier study of Soviet succession struggles. In his latest book, D'Agostino addresses the paradox of how a reform movement designed to fortify Communism actually brought about its downfall. He dismisses those who see this dramatic development as the natural or logical extension of the course of reform, and those who see the collapse as the inevitable consequence of the command economy or of the Soviet system's illegitimacy. Instead, D'Agostino argues that "the end of Communism was never the goal of the Gorbachev government, but like so much else in the history of the Soviet Union, was the unplanned and unintended result of an intense and many-faceted struggle for power" (p. 6). Spotlighting http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Gorbachev's Revolution (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Gorbachev's Revolution. By anthony d'agostino. New York: New York University Press, 1998. Pp. ix + 384. $50 (cloth). In the years following Mikhail Sergeevich Gorbachev's rise to power as general secretary of the Communist Party in 1985, a veritable sea change has swept across the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe, generating an ever growing body of academic and popular literature that seeks to assess the "Gorbachev revolution." One of the newest contributions to these writings is Anthony D'Agostino's Gorbachev's Revolution, which builds on the author's earlier study of Soviet succession struggles. In his latest book, D'Agostino addresses the paradox of how a reform movement designed to fortify Communism actually brought about its downfall. He dismisses those who see this dramatic development as the natural or logical extension of the course of reform, and those who see the collapse as the inevitable consequence of the command economy or of the Soviet system's illegitimacy. Instead, D'Agostino argues that "the end of Communism was never the goal of the Gorbachev government, but like so much else in the history of the Soviet Union, was the unplanned and unintended result of an intense and many-faceted struggle for power" (p. 6). Spotlighting

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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