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"Gofors" Sometimes Need to Be Got For, Too

"Gofors" Sometimes Need to Be Got For, Too Remembering Greg Dening Greg Dening, historian and ethnographer of Oceania, passed away on 13 March 2008 while on a visit to Tasmania. The effects of his scholarship on the histories and ethnographies of the region are profound. Many of us, however, grieve the loss of not only a world-renowned scholar but also a generous colleague, encouraging mentor, and close friend. Greg touched lives everywhere, including here in Hawai‘i. We would like to think that Hawai‘i was one of his special places. Donna Merwick, Greg’s wife and an acclaimed historian of colonial New York, wrote in a recent letter that Honolulu was an intellectual home for him, “a place of stimulation, chal- lenge, and always welcome” (see fi gure 1). After completing his doctoral studies at Harvard University in 1967 under Douglas Oliver, Greg took up his fi rst academic appointment at the University of Hawai‘i, Mänoa, where he taught for both the history and anthropology departments. Accounts of Greg’s efforts to teach cultural history in Hawai‘i can be found in his 1997 article, “Empowering Imaginations,” for The Contemporary Pacifi c and also in his more recent book, Beach Crossings. He returned numer- ous times over the years, including a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

"Gofors" Sometimes Need to Be Got For, Too

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 21 (2) – Aug 29, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

Remembering Greg Dening Greg Dening, historian and ethnographer of Oceania, passed away on 13 March 2008 while on a visit to Tasmania. The effects of his scholarship on the histories and ethnographies of the region are profound. Many of us, however, grieve the loss of not only a world-renowned scholar but also a generous colleague, encouraging mentor, and close friend. Greg touched lives everywhere, including here in Hawai‘i. We would like to think that Hawai‘i was one of his special places. Donna Merwick, Greg’s wife and an acclaimed historian of colonial New York, wrote in a recent letter that Honolulu was an intellectual home for him, “a place of stimulation, chal- lenge, and always welcome” (see fi gure 1). After completing his doctoral studies at Harvard University in 1967 under Douglas Oliver, Greg took up his fi rst academic appointment at the University of Hawai‘i, Mänoa, where he taught for both the history and anthropology departments. Accounts of Greg’s efforts to teach cultural history in Hawai‘i can be found in his 1997 article, “Empowering Imaginations,” for The Contemporary Pacifi c and also in his more recent book, Beach Crossings. He returned numer- ous times over the years, including a

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 29, 2009

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