Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

God Pictures in Korean Contexts: The Ownership and Meaning of Shaman Paintings by Laurel Kendall, Jongsung Yang, and Yul Soo Yoon (review)

God Pictures in Korean Contexts: The Ownership and Meaning of Shaman Paintings by Laurel Kendall,... Journal of Korean Religions 7/2 2016 beliefs clearly. Insisting that there is no universal category for classifying such terms as popular religion or folk beliefs, the author (Walraven) examines the contextual meaning of these terms in Korean history. According to him, these terms acquire meaning only when there is a social differentiation which emerges along with the ‘‘introduction of culture from abroad (204)’’ such as ‘‘great tradition.’’ However, the point of this chapter is that certain popular beliefs, originating from social distinction, often ‘‘managed to latch on’’ (205) to the ‘‘great tradition.’’ Walraven supports this idea by describing how the cult of Guan Yu (pronounced Kwan U in Korean), initiated by the government was ‘‘hijacked by the general population’’ (216) during the Chosŏn dynasty, thus showing the historicity and flexibility of popular beliefs. This informative book provides an excellent introduction to Korean popular beliefs. Therefore it can be used as a textbook for university students in Korean Studies programs or East Asian Studies and general readers who are interested in Korean religious culture. Dong Kyu Kim Senior Researcher, Institute for the Study of Religion Sogang University kimdongkyu@sogang.ac.kr God Pictures in Korean Contexts: The Ownership and Meaning of Shaman Paintings, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Religions University of Hawai'I Press

God Pictures in Korean Contexts: The Ownership and Meaning of Shaman Paintings by Laurel Kendall, Jongsung Yang, and Yul Soo Yoon (review)

Journal of Korean Religions , Volume 7 (2) – Dec 9, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/god-pictures-in-korean-contexts-the-ownership-and-meaning-of-shaman-3a5qv7mM5R
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Institute for the Study of Religion, Sogang University, Korea
ISSN
2093-7288
eISSN
2167-2040

Abstract

Journal of Korean Religions 7/2 2016 beliefs clearly. Insisting that there is no universal category for classifying such terms as popular religion or folk beliefs, the author (Walraven) examines the contextual meaning of these terms in Korean history. According to him, these terms acquire meaning only when there is a social differentiation which emerges along with the ‘‘introduction of culture from abroad (204)’’ such as ‘‘great tradition.’’ However, the point of this chapter is that certain popular beliefs, originating from social distinction, often ‘‘managed to latch on’’ (205) to the ‘‘great tradition.’’ Walraven supports this idea by describing how the cult of Guan Yu (pronounced Kwan U in Korean), initiated by the government was ‘‘hijacked by the general population’’ (216) during the Chosŏn dynasty, thus showing the historicity and flexibility of popular beliefs. This informative book provides an excellent introduction to Korean popular beliefs. Therefore it can be used as a textbook for university students in Korean Studies programs or East Asian Studies and general readers who are interested in Korean religious culture. Dong Kyu Kim Senior Researcher, Institute for the Study of Religion Sogang University kimdongkyu@sogang.ac.kr God Pictures in Korean Contexts: The Ownership and Meaning of Shaman Paintings,

Journal

Journal of Korean ReligionsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 9, 2016

There are no references for this article.