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God-Apes and Fossil Men: Paleoanthropology in South Asia (review)

God-Apes and Fossil Men: Paleoanthropology in South Asia (review) book reviews 311 studied metallographically to determine doctrine and untested assumptions, which how the metal in them was actually used— this paper does a great deal to clear away. there are no micrographs anywhere in this Where next, though, as she points out, volume, a regretable omission. For the pur- because of the limitations of the data so far poses in which bronze was used in the an- collected. Again, the argument has a met- cient world, a wide range of tin contents, allurgical component and it is clear that from 5 percent to 15 percent, would suf- past contributors to the debate have not fice, and was used satisfactorily. Equally, clearly understood the properties of iron existing copper compositions were com- and bronze and how they might compare. petitive, with a Cu–2 percent arsenic com- Possehl and Gullapalli’s work on the Iron position providing blade edges as hard as Age in South India also o¤ers a construc- the bronzes that replaced them in a metal tive survey of the region’s earliest iron to- that was easier to forge. Even the iron im- gether with a radiocarbon chronology. For purity found in many ancient Near Eastern many readers, this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

God-Apes and Fossil Men: Paleoanthropology in South Asia (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 40 (2) – Nov 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283

Abstract

book reviews 311 studied metallographically to determine doctrine and untested assumptions, which how the metal in them was actually used— this paper does a great deal to clear away. there are no micrographs anywhere in this Where next, though, as she points out, volume, a regretable omission. For the pur- because of the limitations of the data so far poses in which bronze was used in the an- collected. Again, the argument has a met- cient world, a wide range of tin contents, allurgical component and it is clear that from 5 percent to 15 percent, would suf- past contributors to the debate have not fice, and was used satisfactorily. Equally, clearly understood the properties of iron existing copper compositions were com- and bronze and how they might compare. petitive, with a Cu–2 percent arsenic com- Possehl and Gullapalli’s work on the Iron position providing blade edges as hard as Age in South India also o¤ers a construc- the bronzes that replaced them in a metal tive survey of the region’s earliest iron to- that was easier to forge. Even the iron im- gether with a radiocarbon chronology. For purity found in many ancient Near Eastern many readers, this

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 1, 2001

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