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Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays ed. by Jing Tsu, David Der-wei Wang (review)

Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays ed. by Jing Tsu, David Der-wei Wang (review) 486 China Review International: Vol. 19, No. 3, 2012 the Yijing to the attention of some sections of the academy and is today a growing field in comparative philosophy. In the twenty-first century, as Smith notes, the wholesale commercialization of the text took place. As in the East, the Yijing has become a part of mainstream culture, for better or for worse. Possibly, this phenomenon can be compared to the treatment of the text by fortune-tellers in the villages and towns of imperial China, albeit on a grander technological and commercial scale. As history has shown, although the Yijing is a democratic and malleable text, its essence survives and continues to fascinate diverse strata of a given society. The Yijing eludes definitive categorization: Poetry or philosophy? Book of wisdom or tool of divination? Classical literature or spiritual text? Mathematical puzzle or buried universal truths? Smith brings all these possibilities to our imagination. Christine A. Hale Christine A. Hale is a doctoral student in the field of Neo-Confucianism and philosophy of education. Note 1. Smith uses pinyin transliteration throughout the book, as opposed to the earlier, now dated, Wade-Giles romanization of Chinese. Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, editors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays ed. by Jing Tsu, David Der-wei Wang (review)

China Review International , Volume 19 (3) – Apr 15, 2012

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9367
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Abstract

486 China Review International: Vol. 19, No. 3, 2012 the Yijing to the attention of some sections of the academy and is today a growing field in comparative philosophy. In the twenty-first century, as Smith notes, the wholesale commercialization of the text took place. As in the East, the Yijing has become a part of mainstream culture, for better or for worse. Possibly, this phenomenon can be compared to the treatment of the text by fortune-tellers in the villages and towns of imperial China, albeit on a grander technological and commercial scale. As history has shown, although the Yijing is a democratic and malleable text, its essence survives and continues to fascinate diverse strata of a given society. The Yijing eludes definitive categorization: Poetry or philosophy? Book of wisdom or tool of divination? Classical literature or spiritual text? Mathematical puzzle or buried universal truths? Smith brings all these possibilities to our imagination. Christine A. Hale Christine A. Hale is a doctoral student in the field of Neo-Confucianism and philosophy of education. Note 1. Smith uses pinyin transliteration throughout the book, as opposed to the earlier, now dated, Wade-Giles romanization of Chinese. Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, editors.

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 15, 2012

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