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Genocide and Settler Society: Frontier Violence and Stolen Indigenous Children in Australian History (review)

Genocide and Settler Society: Frontier Violence and Stolen Indigenous Children in Australian... journal of world history, december 2005 Genocide and Settler Society: Frontier Violence and Stolen Indigenous Children in Australian History. Edited by a. dirk moses. New York: Berghahn Books, 2004. $75.00 (cloth; 400 pp.); $25.00 (paper; 325 pp.; 2005). Over the past few years, genocide studies has begun to take on the distinctive characteristics of a discipline in its own right. Genocide study centers have sprung up, together with dedicated chairs, specialist journals, college courses, Web sites, and a regular schedule of international conferences. In the process, genocide studies has begun to evince a canonical structure. The Nazi Holocaust predominates, to the extent that a significant proportion of scholarly output in the field is concerned with problematizing its centrality. Is the Holocaust the paradigm case, an exemplar par excellence, or is it the unique extreme, in comparison to which other examples are necessarily diminished? Salient examples whose diminution can occasion dismay include the German genocide of the Herero in southwestern Africa at the beginning of the twentieth century, seen by some as a colonial precursor to the Holocaust; the Young Turks' genocide of the Armenians under the cover of World War I, a crime against humanity that successive Turkish http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Genocide and Settler Society: Frontier Violence and Stolen Indigenous Children in Australian History (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 16 (4)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

journal of world history, december 2005 Genocide and Settler Society: Frontier Violence and Stolen Indigenous Children in Australian History. Edited by a. dirk moses. New York: Berghahn Books, 2004. $75.00 (cloth; 400 pp.); $25.00 (paper; 325 pp.; 2005). Over the past few years, genocide studies has begun to take on the distinctive characteristics of a discipline in its own right. Genocide study centers have sprung up, together with dedicated chairs, specialist journals, college courses, Web sites, and a regular schedule of international conferences. In the process, genocide studies has begun to evince a canonical structure. The Nazi Holocaust predominates, to the extent that a significant proportion of scholarly output in the field is concerned with problematizing its centrality. Is the Holocaust the paradigm case, an exemplar par excellence, or is it the unique extreme, in comparison to which other examples are necessarily diminished? Salient examples whose diminution can occasion dismay include the German genocide of the Herero in southwestern Africa at the beginning of the twentieth century, seen by some as a colonial precursor to the Holocaust; the Young Turks' genocide of the Armenians under the cover of World War I, a crime against humanity that successive Turkish

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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