Gendered Spaces and Prehistoric Households: A Geospatial Analysis of Mumun Period Pithouses from South Korea

Gendered Spaces and Prehistoric Households: A Geospatial Analysis of Mumun Period Pithouses from... <p>abstract:</p><p>This article examines pithouse data to ascertain the social dimension of households, namely gender roles and relations, during the Early Mumun and Middle Mumun pottery periods (ca. 1300–500 b.c.) in Chinju [Jinju], South Korea. Pithouses and their interior remains from the Taep&apos;yŏng [RR: Daepyeong] and P&apos;yŏnggŏdong [RR: Pyeonggeodong] sites are analyzed through geospatial and statistical methods. Results indicate that the spatial expression of gender was minimal throughout the Mumun Period despite household space becoming increasingly differentiated. The house was the domain of all genders who largely shared their spaces. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that gender roles were relatively flexible and a gender hierarchy was lacking at the household level.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Gendered Spaces and Prehistoric Households: A Geospatial Analysis of Mumun Period Pithouses from South Korea

Asian Perspectives, Volume 58 (1) – Apr 25, 2019

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283

Abstract

<p>abstract:</p><p>This article examines pithouse data to ascertain the social dimension of households, namely gender roles and relations, during the Early Mumun and Middle Mumun pottery periods (ca. 1300–500 b.c.) in Chinju [Jinju], South Korea. Pithouses and their interior remains from the Taep&apos;yŏng [RR: Daepyeong] and P&apos;yŏnggŏdong [RR: Pyeonggeodong] sites are analyzed through geospatial and statistical methods. Results indicate that the spatial expression of gender was minimal throughout the Mumun Period despite household space becoming increasingly differentiated. The house was the domain of all genders who largely shared their spaces. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that gender roles were relatively flexible and a gender hierarchy was lacking at the household level.</p>

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 25, 2019

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