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From the Margins: Historical Anthropology and Its Futures (review)

From the Margins: Historical Anthropology and Its Futures (review) ment's intention. This quibble aside, The Cold War and the Color Line is a very readable, engaging, and extremely important story, one that all historians of the twentieth century should know. naoko shibusawa Brown University From the Margins: Historical Anthropology and Its Futures. Edited by brian axel. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2002. 313 pp. $79.95 (cloth); $22.95 (paper). Over the past decade, many institutions in higher education moved toward a more global and interdisciplinary approach to learning. While this kind of interaction across and between disciplines has facilitated dialogue and enriched our perspective, the ever-shifting imperatives of globalization, the emergent or changing world orders, and clashes between civilizations have blurred discrete institutional boundaries as well as their conventions and epistemological underpinnings. In this highly readable and informative collection of essays, Brian Axel has brought together a group of prominent scholars to reexamine the dilemma of "interdisciplinarity" in the study of history and anthropology to facilitate a "critical exchange" between two "sister disciplines." The book consists of nine essays with an introductory overview and a discussion of methodology. Axel opens his introduction with the "role of citation" and pedagogy in the production of knowledge in anthropology. In the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

From the Margins: Historical Anthropology and Its Futures (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 15 (4)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

ment's intention. This quibble aside, The Cold War and the Color Line is a very readable, engaging, and extremely important story, one that all historians of the twentieth century should know. naoko shibusawa Brown University From the Margins: Historical Anthropology and Its Futures. Edited by brian axel. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2002. 313 pp. $79.95 (cloth); $22.95 (paper). Over the past decade, many institutions in higher education moved toward a more global and interdisciplinary approach to learning. While this kind of interaction across and between disciplines has facilitated dialogue and enriched our perspective, the ever-shifting imperatives of globalization, the emergent or changing world orders, and clashes between civilizations have blurred discrete institutional boundaries as well as their conventions and epistemological underpinnings. In this highly readable and informative collection of essays, Brian Axel has brought together a group of prominent scholars to reexamine the dilemma of "interdisciplinarity" in the study of history and anthropology to facilitate a "critical exchange" between two "sister disciplines." The book consists of nine essays with an introductory overview and a discussion of methodology. Axel opens his introduction with the "role of citation" and pedagogy in the production of knowledge in anthropology. In the

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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