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From the Editor

From the Editor In Asian Theatre Journal 28, Association of Asian Performance officers Siyuan Lui and David Jortner developed a series on the founding of our field of Asian theatre studies. Their section caused me to pause and to think about what changes are taking place. This more "regular" issue celebrates our thirtieth year and has an eclectic mix of recent work but also communicates what seem to be trends. Almost half the scholars are Asian by birth, though of course a number teach or study in the United States. We are more diverse than AAP may have been in the first issue that Jim Brandon and Elizabeth Wichmann edited thirty years ago. We are rethinking history. Siyuan Liu shows how the "traditional" jingju Princess Baihua was reworked to conform to the political needs and interests of developing PRC and how those changes in the repertoire have been perpetuated since. Guanda Wu dives into the debate over the female impersonator in the early years of the era--arguments between men over the idea of women on stage. Gary Mathews asks us to consider Zeami, who we customarily see through a Buddhist lens as a proponent of Confucian principles in his dramaturgy. Re-visioning http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

In Asian Theatre Journal 28, Association of Asian Performance officers Siyuan Lui and David Jortner developed a series on the founding of our field of Asian theatre studies. Their section caused me to pause and to think about what changes are taking place. This more "regular" issue celebrates our thirtieth year and has an eclectic mix of recent work but also communicates what seem to be trends. Almost half the scholars are Asian by birth, though of course a number teach or study in the United States. We are more diverse than AAP may have been in the first issue that Jim Brandon and Elizabeth Wichmann edited thirty years ago. We are rethinking history. Siyuan Liu shows how the "traditional" jingju Princess Baihua was reworked to conform to the political needs and interests of developing PRC and how those changes in the repertoire have been perpetuated since. Guanda Wu dives into the debate over the female impersonator in the early years of the era--arguments between men over the idea of women on stage. Gary Mathews asks us to consider Zeami, who we customarily see through a Buddhist lens as a proponent of Confucian principles in his dramaturgy. Re-visioning

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 6, 2013

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