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From The Editor

From The Editor Many of the articles in this issue explore variations of intercultural theatre. Who would have thought that Lee Gunsam, a noted Korean modern playwright, would have written his first plays in English while a student in the United States? Yet in Wook-Dong Kim's essay we see how the Cold War led to educational exchanges that carried Kim to graduate study in America, impacting what he brought back to Seoul theatre. Siyuan Liu's essay also discusses results of study in the United States, but on Chinese theatre makers, probing their failed attempts at anti-realist theatre immediately after their return. Loo Fung Ying and Loo Fung Chiat, meanwhile, explore an indigenized lion dance in Malaysia and note that lion dance as sport has gone to another level in Malaysian competitions that have in turn impacted other Sinophone areas. While to indigenize or not to indigenize has remained a question in Malaysia's politically fraught environment, the authors focus on one troupe that brings together Malay and Tamil instruments with the normative Chinese percussion. The display relates to a current government 1Malaysia program, which seeks to defuse racial tensions that have become ensconced. Meanwhile, Tiffany Strawson shows how a group of "over-the-hill" http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

From The Editor

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 33 (1) – Mar 11, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many of the articles in this issue explore variations of intercultural theatre. Who would have thought that Lee Gunsam, a noted Korean modern playwright, would have written his first plays in English while a student in the United States? Yet in Wook-Dong Kim's essay we see how the Cold War led to educational exchanges that carried Kim to graduate study in America, impacting what he brought back to Seoul theatre. Siyuan Liu's essay also discusses results of study in the United States, but on Chinese theatre makers, probing their failed attempts at anti-realist theatre immediately after their return. Loo Fung Ying and Loo Fung Chiat, meanwhile, explore an indigenized lion dance in Malaysia and note that lion dance as sport has gone to another level in Malaysian competitions that have in turn impacted other Sinophone areas. While to indigenize or not to indigenize has remained a question in Malaysia's politically fraught environment, the authors focus on one troupe that brings together Malay and Tamil instruments with the normative Chinese percussion. The display relates to a current government 1Malaysia program, which seeks to defuse racial tensions that have become ensconced. Meanwhile, Tiffany Strawson shows how a group of "over-the-hill"

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 11, 2016

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