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From the Editor

From the Editor editor’s note Many readers of AT J will be saddened to know that Faubion Bowers, eighty-two, died of a heart attack in his New York apartment on November 16, 1999. He had lived long enough to help me complete my translation and adaptation of a 1998 Japanese book by Okamoto Shiro, the English title of which will be The Man Who Saved Kabuki: Faubion Bowers and Theatrical Censorship in Occupied Japan. The first draft was completed three days before his passing. It contains the most complete account of what Bowers accomplished during the early Occupation, when he became the savior of Japan’s 350-year-old classi- cal theatre, kabuki. Bowers, who was fluent in many languages, includ- ing Chinese and Japanese, went on to write many memorable books about theatre and music (including a definitive biography of Alexan- der Scriabin). Asian theatre specialists are greatly in debt to his Japa- nese Theatre (1952), Dance in India (1953), and the strikingly compre- hensive Theatre in the East: A Survey of Asian Dance and Drama (1956). Faubion eventually made his way into ATJ, providing our recent kabuki issue with a modern play translation, a brief essay on Bandö Tamasa- burö V’s performance as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

editor’s note Many readers of AT J will be saddened to know that Faubion Bowers, eighty-two, died of a heart attack in his New York apartment on November 16, 1999. He had lived long enough to help me complete my translation and adaptation of a 1998 Japanese book by Okamoto Shiro, the English title of which will be The Man Who Saved Kabuki: Faubion Bowers and Theatrical Censorship in Occupied Japan. The first draft was completed three days before his passing. It contains the most complete account of what Bowers accomplished during the early Occupation, when he became the savior of Japan’s 350-year-old classi- cal theatre, kabuki. Bowers, who was fluent in many languages, includ- ing Chinese and Japanese, went on to write many memorable books about theatre and music (including a definitive biography of Alexan- der Scriabin). Asian theatre specialists are greatly in debt to his Japa- nese Theatre (1952), Dance in India (1953), and the strikingly compre- hensive Theatre in the East: A Survey of Asian Dance and Drama (1956). Faubion eventually made his way into ATJ, providing our recent kabuki issue with a modern play translation, a brief essay on Bandö Tamasa- burö V’s performance as

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 1, 2001

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