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From Silver to Cocaine: Latin American Commodity Chains and the Building of the World Economy, 1500–2000 (review)

From Silver to Cocaine: Latin American Commodity Chains and the Building of the World Economy,... Book Reviews From Silver to Cocaine: Latin American Commodity Chains and the Building of the World Economy, 1500­2000. Edited by steven topik, carlos marichal, and zephyr frank. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2006. 377 pp. $23.95 (paper). Topik, Marichal, and Frank bring together sixteen business and economic historians in this impressive collection to explore and promote the value of what they describe as the "commodity chain approach" to history. Each of twelve essays focuses on one commodity that was extracted from Latin America between 1500 and 2000, with the expansion of the international capitalist marketplace. When the Spanish used Mexican metal to monetize the Atlantic world economy, silver was transformed into the internationally valuable commodity "money" and the land and peoples of Latin America into resources that could be bought and sold. In turn, for the next five hundred years industrial revolutions and wars fueled corporate and consumer demand in Europe and North America for an array of Latin American raw materials including indigo, cochineal, tobacco, coffee, sugar, cacao, bananas, fertilizers, rubber, henequen, and cocaine. The contributors discuss each of these raw materials as "products" circulating within transnational circuits of supply and demand, approaching history from the perspective http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

From Silver to Cocaine: Latin American Commodity Chains and the Building of the World Economy, 1500–2000 (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 18 (3) – Nov 7, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews From Silver to Cocaine: Latin American Commodity Chains and the Building of the World Economy, 1500­2000. Edited by steven topik, carlos marichal, and zephyr frank. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2006. 377 pp. $23.95 (paper). Topik, Marichal, and Frank bring together sixteen business and economic historians in this impressive collection to explore and promote the value of what they describe as the "commodity chain approach" to history. Each of twelve essays focuses on one commodity that was extracted from Latin America between 1500 and 2000, with the expansion of the international capitalist marketplace. When the Spanish used Mexican metal to monetize the Atlantic world economy, silver was transformed into the internationally valuable commodity "money" and the land and peoples of Latin America into resources that could be bought and sold. In turn, for the next five hundred years industrial revolutions and wars fueled corporate and consumer demand in Europe and North America for an array of Latin American raw materials including indigo, cochineal, tobacco, coffee, sugar, cacao, bananas, fertilizers, rubber, henequen, and cocaine. The contributors discuss each of these raw materials as "products" circulating within transnational circuits of supply and demand, approaching history from the perspective

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 7, 2007

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