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From Representation to Apotheosis: No 's Modern Myth of Okina

From Representation to Apotheosis: No 's Modern Myth of Okina Modern discussions of ritual and the origins of the six-hundred-year-old Japanese no theatre have focused on the enigmatic Okina dance--one of the "three rites," shikisanban, enacted today by performers at the New Year's and other ceremonial occasions. For modern no actors, Okina is the heart of no: a living prototype of the ritual theatre no once supposedly embodied but somehow lost. Yet Okina's very rituality differentiates it from no. Hence Okina is cited both as an archetype of no's past and as a salient point of contrast for defining no's artistry today. This article declares this relationship between Okina and no to be a modern formulation resulting from three factors: a change in religiosity in the early twentieth century, the role of scholars and performers of that era in reclaiming Okina's centrality to no, and assumptions in the fields of anthropology and folklore studies about the origin of theatre in ritual. The modern conceptualization of Okina functions as an invented tradition engendering authority for no professionals, particularly the hereditary elite, who compete to lay claim to its mystery, sanctity, and power. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

From Representation to Apotheosis: No 's Modern Myth of Okina

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 17 (2) – Sep 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

Modern discussions of ritual and the origins of the six-hundred-year-old Japanese no theatre have focused on the enigmatic Okina dance--one of the "three rites," shikisanban, enacted today by performers at the New Year's and other ceremonial occasions. For modern no actors, Okina is the heart of no: a living prototype of the ritual theatre no once supposedly embodied but somehow lost. Yet Okina's very rituality differentiates it from no. Hence Okina is cited both as an archetype of no's past and as a salient point of contrast for defining no's artistry today. This article declares this relationship between Okina and no to be a modern formulation resulting from three factors: a change in religiosity in the early twentieth century, the role of scholars and performers of that era in reclaiming Okina's centrality to no, and assumptions in the fields of anthropology and folklore studies about the origin of theatre in ritual. The modern conceptualization of Okina functions as an invented tradition engendering authority for no professionals, particularly the hereditary elite, who compete to lay claim to its mystery, sanctity, and power.

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 1, 2000

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