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From King Cane to the Last Sugar Mill: Agricultural Technology and the Making of Hawai‘i’s Premier Crop by C Allan Jones and Robert V Osgood (review)

From King Cane to the Last Sugar Mill: Agricultural Technology and the Making of Hawai‘i’s... the contemporary pacific · 29:1 (2017) the last remaining sugar mill to survive into the twenty-first century. Jones and Osgood begin in chapter 1 by describing the indigenous agricultural infrastructure in conjunction with Hawaiian political organization prior to the arrival of Westerners in the eighteenth century. With the emergence of the first commercial sugar company in the late 1830s, the California gold rush, the US Civil War, and the decline of the whaling industry incentivized expansion of large-scale sugarcane cultivation. Due to the passing of the Reciprocity Treaty of 1876, the Hawaiian sugar industry boomed, increasing production twenty-fold between 1876 and 1896. During this time, sugar companies in Hawai`i led the industry with ditch-irrigation technology, steam-powered machinery, and new fertilizers. Nearing the turn of the nineteenth century, powerful political interests, including prominent sugar industry leaders, staged a coup in 1893 to stabilize the sugar industry's political and economic situation, overthrowing the Hawaiian monarchy and setting the stage for annexation later in 1898. As chapters 3 and 4 describe, the industry continued to grow rapidly during the period before the Great Depression and despite the Depression era's low sugar prices due to improvements in irrigation infrastructure, hybrid varieties of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

From King Cane to the Last Sugar Mill: Agricultural Technology and the Making of Hawai‘i’s Premier Crop by C Allan Jones and Robert V Osgood (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 29 (1) – Jan 21, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 29:1 (2017) the last remaining sugar mill to survive into the twenty-first century. Jones and Osgood begin in chapter 1 by describing the indigenous agricultural infrastructure in conjunction with Hawaiian political organization prior to the arrival of Westerners in the eighteenth century. With the emergence of the first commercial sugar company in the late 1830s, the California gold rush, the US Civil War, and the decline of the whaling industry incentivized expansion of large-scale sugarcane cultivation. Due to the passing of the Reciprocity Treaty of 1876, the Hawaiian sugar industry boomed, increasing production twenty-fold between 1876 and 1896. During this time, sugar companies in Hawai`i led the industry with ditch-irrigation technology, steam-powered machinery, and new fertilizers. Nearing the turn of the nineteenth century, powerful political interests, including prominent sugar industry leaders, staged a coup in 1893 to stabilize the sugar industry's political and economic situation, overthrowing the Hawaiian monarchy and setting the stage for annexation later in 1898. As chapters 3 and 4 describe, the industry continued to grow rapidly during the period before the Great Depression and despite the Depression era's low sugar prices due to improvements in irrigation infrastructure, hybrid varieties of

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 21, 2017

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