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from Journey into Light

from Journey into Light 16-1 Cambodia Muse 4/13/04 2:55 PM Page 65 RANACHITH RONNIE YIMSUT ii. root of an evil When the bell rang, we gathered, as usual, under the nation’s flag. I noticed the older students and the teachers were talking and whispering, but I was not really concerned with what they were saying. We were all in the school- yard of Sala Komrou (Model School), a new school just north of Siem Reap town. It was 18 March 1970. “Get in line and be very quiet!” one of the teachers barked. We fell in line according to our grade and gender. About fifteen minutes later, every- one was in line and at attention. The chattering died down as our principal, surrounded by four soldiers in full combat gear, came out of the building. They walked slowly and stopped in front of us. It was the first time I had seen this many soldiers up close. They held their m-16s ready, their sharp eyes scanning the area. None of them smiled. The schoolyard was absolutely quiet. It frightened me a little. It was also a little exciting, particularly to those of us boys whose fa- vorite subjects were guns and soldiers. Most http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

from Journey into Light

Manoa , Volume 16 (1) – Apr 30, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x

Abstract

16-1 Cambodia Muse 4/13/04 2:55 PM Page 65 RANACHITH RONNIE YIMSUT ii. root of an evil When the bell rang, we gathered, as usual, under the nation’s flag. I noticed the older students and the teachers were talking and whispering, but I was not really concerned with what they were saying. We were all in the school- yard of Sala Komrou (Model School), a new school just north of Siem Reap town. It was 18 March 1970. “Get in line and be very quiet!” one of the teachers barked. We fell in line according to our grade and gender. About fifteen minutes later, every- one was in line and at attention. The chattering died down as our principal, surrounded by four soldiers in full combat gear, came out of the building. They walked slowly and stopped in front of us. It was the first time I had seen this many soldiers up close. They held their m-16s ready, their sharp eyes scanning the area. None of them smiled. The schoolyard was absolutely quiet. It frightened me a little. It was also a little exciting, particularly to those of us boys whose fa- vorite subjects were guns and soldiers. Most

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 30, 2004

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