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French Polynesia

French Polynesia Polynesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 1999 to 30 June 2000 Reviews of American Sâmoa, the Cook Islands, Hawai`i, Tuvalu, and Wallis and Futuna are not included in this issue. omy also worked to the government's advantage, putting in a solid performance. French Polynesia was progressing steadily toward the new political status of overseas country (pays d'outre mer 1) in the latter half of 1999. The draft constitutional law project was adopted by the French national assembly on 10 June and later by the senate on 12 October. Notwithstanding the concerted efforts of DeputyMayor Michel Buillard and SenatorPresident Gaston Flosse, France rejected numerous proposals by the territorial assembly to increase French Polynesia's powers under the new status. Most important (and unlike the agreement reached by New Caledonia) the transfer of specific powers to French Polynesia as a pays d'outre mer would not be definitive; in other words, it could be reversed at a later date. Nor did the French Polynesian assembly realize its ambition to have its legislation accountable only to the French constitutional council. French Polynesia also sought a major expansion of its powers to negotiate international accords, including the a priori right to sign http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

Polynesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 1999 to 30 June 2000 Reviews of American Sâmoa, the Cook Islands, Hawai`i, Tuvalu, and Wallis and Futuna are not included in this issue. omy also worked to the government's advantage, putting in a solid performance. French Polynesia was progressing steadily toward the new political status of overseas country (pays d'outre mer 1) in the latter half of 1999. The draft constitutional law project was adopted by the French national assembly on 10 June and later by the senate on 12 October. Notwithstanding the concerted efforts of DeputyMayor Michel Buillard and SenatorPresident Gaston Flosse, France rejected numerous proposals by the territorial assembly to increase French Polynesia's powers under the new status. Most important (and unlike the agreement reached by New Caledonia) the transfer of specific powers to French Polynesia as a pays d'outre mer would not be definitive; in other words, it could be reversed at a later date. Nor did the French Polynesian assembly realize its ambition to have its legislation accountable only to the French constitutional council. French Polynesia also sought a major expansion of its powers to negotiate international accords, including the a priori right to sign

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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