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Frantisek (Frank) Lichtenberk, 1945–2015: A Tribute

Frantisek (Frank) Lichtenberk, 1945–2015: A Tribute Andrew Pawley AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY Frantisek (Frank) Lichtenberk died in a train accident in Auckland on April 29, 2015, aged 69.1 During a career of forty years, he made outstanding contributions to descriptive and comparative-historical research on Oceanic languages and to linguistic theory. He was arguably the best all-round linguist to specialize in the indigenous languages of the Pacific. That's a big call, because there have been many accomplished scholars working in this field over the last 150 years, but I can think of no other who has done so many different things quite so well: productive field work, writing prodigious grammars, compiling dictionaries, doing phonological and morphosyntactic reconstruction and dialect geography, drawing culture-historical inferences from lexical reconstructions, and seeking general principles of language structure and change. His papers and books are meticulously researched, rigorously argued, and beautifully constructed. He gained a world reputation for his writings on grammatical typology and language change, which drew heavily on examples from Oceanic languages. But such was his modesty that he was often underestimated by those not familiar with the full range of his accomplishments. Frantisek Lichtenberk was born in Dubi, a small town in what is now the Czech Republic, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Frantisek (Frank) Lichtenberk, 1945–2015: A Tribute

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 54 (2) – Nov 23, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
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Abstract

Andrew Pawley AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY Frantisek (Frank) Lichtenberk died in a train accident in Auckland on April 29, 2015, aged 69.1 During a career of forty years, he made outstanding contributions to descriptive and comparative-historical research on Oceanic languages and to linguistic theory. He was arguably the best all-round linguist to specialize in the indigenous languages of the Pacific. That's a big call, because there have been many accomplished scholars working in this field over the last 150 years, but I can think of no other who has done so many different things quite so well: productive field work, writing prodigious grammars, compiling dictionaries, doing phonological and morphosyntactic reconstruction and dialect geography, drawing culture-historical inferences from lexical reconstructions, and seeking general principles of language structure and change. His papers and books are meticulously researched, rigorously argued, and beautifully constructed. He gained a world reputation for his writings on grammatical typology and language change, which drew heavily on examples from Oceanic languages. But such was his modesty that he was often underestimated by those not familiar with the full range of his accomplishments. Frantisek Lichtenberk was born in Dubi, a small town in what is now the Czech Republic,

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 23, 2015

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