Frank & Jindori

Frank & Jindori By Christine Hyung-Oak Lee efore the humans wielded blades that spat metal and fire, before we were born, before our mothers and grandmothers were born, there was no long barbed wire fence across the middle mountainous regions under which one must dig and slink across under cover of darkness. In those days when there was one Korea, we could visit the bears in Paektusan near the area where the human language shifts from Korean to Chinese, and then venture south to Gyeongju and visit the monks in such places as Sokkuram Grotto and the various fortresses. It was a countryside that made a dog sniff relentlessly, the air a wild concoction of rabbit and grasses and squirrels and berries. The monks at Sokkuram Grotto were a generous bunch, a welcome sight after trekking through the mountains above Gyeongju, always a bowl filled with food, and another, filled to the brim with water, awaiting you after a long journey. And the warrior monks at NamHanSanSeong Fortress outside of old Seoul were rumored to be very kind to dogs, despite their ferocious reputations. They were good for sanctuary in the worst weather and were always reliable and disciplined men who, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture University of Hawai'I Press

Frank & Jindori

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, Volume 7 (1)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/frank-jindori-Lx4T1dXQ8W
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1944-6500
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

By Christine Hyung-Oak Lee efore the humans wielded blades that spat metal and fire, before we were born, before our mothers and grandmothers were born, there was no long barbed wire fence across the middle mountainous regions under which one must dig and slink across under cover of darkness. In those days when there was one Korea, we could visit the bears in Paektusan near the area where the human language shifts from Korean to Chinese, and then venture south to Gyeongju and visit the monks in such places as Sokkuram Grotto and the various fortresses. It was a countryside that made a dog sniff relentlessly, the air a wild concoction of rabbit and grasses and squirrels and berries. The monks at Sokkuram Grotto were a generous bunch, a welcome sight after trekking through the mountains above Gyeongju, always a bowl filled with food, and another, filled to the brim with water, awaiting you after a long journey. And the warrior monks at NamHanSanSeong Fortress outside of old Seoul were rumored to be very kind to dogs, despite their ferocious reputations. They were good for sanctuary in the worst weather and were always reliable and disciplined men who,

Journal

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & CultureUniversity of Hawai'I Press

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off