Forces of Habit: Drugs and the Making of the Modern World (review)

Forces of Habit: Drugs and the Making of the Modern World (review) Book Reviews had allied themselves with the European merchants and could not now break free. Conceptually, Barendse is in line with current thinking about international trade networks, but not ahead of it. His biggest contribution is the original detail he brings to his study, based on many years of doctoral and postdoctoral archival research. For me, this detail often proved overwhelming and distracting, combining extraordinary scholarship with occasional pedantry, without providing clear guideposts as to what was forest and what was trees. All readers, however, will roundly applaud Barendse's apparently tireless efforts in filling out our picture of the Indian Ocean trade of the seventeenth century. howard spodek Temple University Forces of Habit: Drugs and the Making of the Modern World. By david t. courtwright. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2001. 277 + viii pp. $24.95 (cloth); $16.95 (paper). With a knack for anecdote as well as grand synthesis, David T. Courtwright, a professor of history at the University of North Florida, has written a concise, highly readable world history of drugs. He takes us from ganja smoking in ancient India to vodka swilling in modern Russia, and he argues that the globalization of increasingly potent drugs--a development http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Forces of Habit: Drugs and the Making of the Modern World (review)

Journal of World History, Volume 15 (2)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews had allied themselves with the European merchants and could not now break free. Conceptually, Barendse is in line with current thinking about international trade networks, but not ahead of it. His biggest contribution is the original detail he brings to his study, based on many years of doctoral and postdoctoral archival research. For me, this detail often proved overwhelming and distracting, combining extraordinary scholarship with occasional pedantry, without providing clear guideposts as to what was forest and what was trees. All readers, however, will roundly applaud Barendse's apparently tireless efforts in filling out our picture of the Indian Ocean trade of the seventeenth century. howard spodek Temple University Forces of Habit: Drugs and the Making of the Modern World. By david t. courtwright. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2001. 277 + viii pp. $24.95 (cloth); $16.95 (paper). With a knack for anecdote as well as grand synthesis, David T. Courtwright, a professor of history at the University of North Florida, has written a concise, highly readable world history of drugs. He takes us from ganja smoking in ancient India to vodka swilling in modern Russia, and he argues that the globalization of increasingly potent drugs--a development

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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