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Fools Are Everywhere: The Court Jester around the World (review)

Fools Are Everywhere: The Court Jester around the World (review) interested in the areas of origin of spices and in reconstructing the ancient trading routes. Another aspect of the early treatment of spices, the enrichment in the countries of spice trade and spice consumption, seems to be less important to him. The last, very readable chapter of the book, "In Quest of Spicery," deals with the problem of the reliability of sources. It is often not clear whether products and their names remained the same through time. Dalby reports on the problem that cumin in recipes from the Mediterranean area was replaced by caraway when the recipes were brought to Central Europe. What were products like cinnamon and cassia in reality, when antique writers wrote about them? Were these authors really able to give a reliable report about the trading routes and the area of origin where the valuable spices were harvested? This uncertainty exists as long as predominantly literally texts are quoted to reconstruct the history of spices. Dalby does so; he neglects many archaeological and botanical records about the history and spread of spices. These disciplines can fill the gap of knowledge, if they are included to the interdisciplinary project of outlining the history of spices http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Fools Are Everywhere: The Court Jester around the World (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 14 (4) – Oct 12, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

interested in the areas of origin of spices and in reconstructing the ancient trading routes. Another aspect of the early treatment of spices, the enrichment in the countries of spice trade and spice consumption, seems to be less important to him. The last, very readable chapter of the book, "In Quest of Spicery," deals with the problem of the reliability of sources. It is often not clear whether products and their names remained the same through time. Dalby reports on the problem that cumin in recipes from the Mediterranean area was replaced by caraway when the recipes were brought to Central Europe. What were products like cinnamon and cassia in reality, when antique writers wrote about them? Were these authors really able to give a reliable report about the trading routes and the area of origin where the valuable spices were harvested? This uncertainty exists as long as predominantly literally texts are quoted to reconstruct the history of spices. Dalby does so; he neglects many archaeological and botanical records about the history and spread of spices. These disciplines can fill the gap of knowledge, if they are included to the interdisciplinary project of outlining the history of spices

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 12, 2003

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