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Flash Point North Korea: The Pueblo and EC-121 Crises (review)

Flash Point North Korea: The Pueblo and EC-121 Crises (review) korean studies vol. 28 · 2004 sion of the specific connections underpinning the broad correlations claimed between small farmers, state discipline, and growth is warranted. The Economic Planning Board, one of the key institutions in the state's development effort, is not even mentioned. Distortions of fact shake the reader's confidence in the author's story. For example, page 153 states that Park was assassinated in a "military coup planned by fellow generals" (but cia Director Kim Jae-kyu shot him and generals loyal to Park took over later). In an appendix, the author warns of possible shortcomings resulting from the "dearth of sources" on South Korean political economy (p. 362). Readers of this journal might take exception to this assertion. The claim that "there is surprisingly little in any language that delves deeply into the 1950s and 1960s" (p. 362) is surprisingly strange given that no Korean sources are cited. The vast majority of references in the Korea chapter are to secondary sources, mostly books published outside of Korea, while numerous English-language materials-- including research institute reports, theses, and newspapers--are ignored. Discipline and Development is one in a growing set of books that seek to explain varying levels of state http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Flash Point North Korea: The Pueblo and EC-121 Crises (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 28 (1) – Nov 7, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1529
Publisher site
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Abstract

korean studies vol. 28 · 2004 sion of the specific connections underpinning the broad correlations claimed between small farmers, state discipline, and growth is warranted. The Economic Planning Board, one of the key institutions in the state's development effort, is not even mentioned. Distortions of fact shake the reader's confidence in the author's story. For example, page 153 states that Park was assassinated in a "military coup planned by fellow generals" (but cia Director Kim Jae-kyu shot him and generals loyal to Park took over later). In an appendix, the author warns of possible shortcomings resulting from the "dearth of sources" on South Korean political economy (p. 362). Readers of this journal might take exception to this assertion. The claim that "there is surprisingly little in any language that delves deeply into the 1950s and 1960s" (p. 362) is surprisingly strange given that no Korean sources are cited. The vast majority of references in the Korea chapter are to secondary sources, mostly books published outside of Korea, while numerous English-language materials-- including research institute reports, theses, and newspapers--are ignored. Discipline and Development is one in a growing set of books that seek to explain varying levels of state

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 7, 2004

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