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Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and Their Adversaries in World War II (review)

Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and Their Adversaries in World War II (review) 208 the contemporary pacific • spring 2003 nationalist discourse” and modern other, it would seem that the individ- military prostitution. Choi argues that ual combatants ought to be fired by while silencing these victims (“the hatred of their opponents, thereby dominant mode of operation in Japan reducing their immediate conflict to as well as in other Asian countries”) one of essential simplicity. After all, in prevents healing, a nationalistic dis- warfare, action must beget at least an course of reparations also “does not equivalent reaction or one’s own life heal the psychic and subjective wounds is in acute danger, and the gratuitous but deepens them when not properly surrender of existence is not normal executed”; instead she urges finding behavior in any circumstances. Wilde “a space so they can speak the pain of may not have been thinking of battle war memories and their subjectivity when he wrote “for each man kills the grounded on pain transformed” (407). thing he loves,” yet, as Mark John- The chapters in Perilous Memories ston shows, there are subtleties and vary in style as well as content; some ambiguities involved in the clash of rely heavily on academic jargon while armed warriors. A http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and Their Adversaries in World War II (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 15 (1) – Feb 10, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

208 the contemporary pacific • spring 2003 nationalist discourse” and modern other, it would seem that the individ- military prostitution. Choi argues that ual combatants ought to be fired by while silencing these victims (“the hatred of their opponents, thereby dominant mode of operation in Japan reducing their immediate conflict to as well as in other Asian countries”) one of essential simplicity. After all, in prevents healing, a nationalistic dis- warfare, action must beget at least an course of reparations also “does not equivalent reaction or one’s own life heal the psychic and subjective wounds is in acute danger, and the gratuitous but deepens them when not properly surrender of existence is not normal executed”; instead she urges finding behavior in any circumstances. Wilde “a space so they can speak the pain of may not have been thinking of battle war memories and their subjectivity when he wrote “for each man kills the grounded on pain transformed” (407). thing he loves,” yet, as Mark John- The chapters in Perilous Memories ston shows, there are subtleties and vary in style as well as content; some ambiguities involved in the clash of rely heavily on academic jargon while armed warriors. A

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 10, 2003

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