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Fault Lines: Cultural Memory and Japanese Surrealism (review)

Fault Lines: Cultural Memory and Japanese Surrealism (review) B ook R ev ie ws 367 that we are presented only with relevant information, given only once, and condensed into seven concise chapters. Leiter has also done a stunning job of annotating the text, diligently footnoting hundreds of quotes that are not referenced in the original. LeiterÕs appendixes extend the scope of the original and cast a more scholarly tone. The chronology of kabuki events between 1940 and 1948, the Þrst of its kind to appear in English, focuses mainly on events in Tokyo. Although this is indeed where most theatrical activity occurred at the time, I cannot help wondering what plays were being performed in the provinces by the kabuki troupes of the Japan Touring Theatre League, but perhaps this is a topic for another book. The second appendix summarizes the plays men- tioned in the text. Those listed in the text are mostly plays that belong to the standard repertory today, for which summaries are available elsewhere (as in LeiterÕs own Kabuki Encyclopedia). The much less familiar new plays written and performed during the war, which are mentioned in the Þrst appendix, do not have summaries. This would have been an added bonus, but perhaps this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Fault Lines: Cultural Memory and Japanese Surrealism (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 19 (2) – Sep 1, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

B ook R ev ie ws 367 that we are presented only with relevant information, given only once, and condensed into seven concise chapters. Leiter has also done a stunning job of annotating the text, diligently footnoting hundreds of quotes that are not referenced in the original. LeiterÕs appendixes extend the scope of the original and cast a more scholarly tone. The chronology of kabuki events between 1940 and 1948, the Þrst of its kind to appear in English, focuses mainly on events in Tokyo. Although this is indeed where most theatrical activity occurred at the time, I cannot help wondering what plays were being performed in the provinces by the kabuki troupes of the Japan Touring Theatre League, but perhaps this is a topic for another book. The second appendix summarizes the plays men- tioned in the text. Those listed in the text are mostly plays that belong to the standard repertory today, for which summaries are available elsewhere (as in LeiterÕs own Kabuki Encyclopedia). The much less familiar new plays written and performed during the war, which are mentioned in the Þrst appendix, do not have summaries. This would have been an added bonus, but perhaps this

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

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